Medicine

A personal physician who provides long-term comprehensive care in the office and the hospital, managing both common and complex illness of adolescents, adults, and the elderly. Internists are trained in the diagnosis and treatment of of cancer, infections, and diseases affecting the heart, blood, kidneys, joints and digestive, respiratory, and vascular systems. They are also trained in the essentials of primary care internal medicine which incorporates an understanding of disease prevention, wellness, substance abuse, mental health, and effective treatment of common problems of the eyes, ears, skin, nervous system, and reproductive organs.1

Internists can receive training in the following subspecialties:

  • Adolescent Medicine
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology
  • Critical Care Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism
  • Gastroenterology
  • Geriatric Medicine
  • Hematology
  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine
  • Infectious Disease
  • Interventional Cardiology
  • Medical Oncology
  • Nephrology
  • Pulmonary Disease
  • Rheumatology
  • Sleep Medicine
  • Sports Medicine
  • Transplant Hepatology

Training/residency information

The residency for general internal medicine is three years. To practice in an internal medicine subspecialty requires from one to three years of additional training.

For more information about these specialty, including the nature of the work, personal characteristics, residency requirements, match data, workforce statistics, compensation, and relevant links and readings, please see the AAMC page on these specialties (requires login to AAMC site. See "Specialty Pages" tab).

Department of Medicine

Residency Director: Lee Berkowitz, MD

Career Goal Advisors

Student Interest Group

Elective Opportunities

2 Week Career Exploration Opportunities