Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test (CHMIT)

Background

The purpose of the Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test (CHMIT) is to estimate overall speech production in adults with speech difficulties. It was developed for people who may have difficulties reading or producing sentences (e.g. people with aphasia). Tests have been, and continue to be, developed in different languages.

It takes 5 minutes to administer the CHMIT and 5 minutes to score it. Each test The test includes 600 unique words, but only 50 words are used each time the test is administered. The words are organized in sets that are phonetically similar but also as diverse as possible. This way we can minimize the risk that listeners learn the content of the test or use logic to predict the words they hear.

One word from each of the word sets is selected at random and speakers say these words by repeating a spoken or recorded model. The words are recorded and later presented to listeners for identification. We have found that a write-down procedure is used to score the test. For test-retest purposes, it is sufficient to have a single listener score the test, but to ensure strong reliability, we recommend using three listeners.

The test is meant to be administered via software. Because the test comes with audio-recorded and printed models, it is not necessary for the test administrator to know the language that is tested. Fluency is, of course, required for the listeners who score the test.

Over the years, we have used different software to run the CHMIT. You may download one version of the the software by following the instructions below. We also provide pdf files showing test content for different languages. These may be downloaded for educational, clinical, and research use. We hope you will find them useful. Please note that commercial use is prohibited (see copyright statement). Additional tests will be posted in the future, as they become available.

PP

We are currently collecting norms for the CHMIT in Spanish and Greek. Software modifications have been made to accommodate international font. This software is not yet available for download. We are pursuing modifications to a tablet format to make it as practical as possible for speech-language pathologists. (Above: Pravasilis and Fisher at a poster presentation for the Spanish and Greek CHMIT).

 

English: Haley, K.L. (2011). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, English Version (CHMIT-e). pdf

Finnish: Morris, M., & Haley, K.L. (2011). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, Finnish Version (CHMIT-fi).  pdf

French: Jozefowicz, S. & Haley, K.L. (2011). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, French Version (CMHIT-fr).  pdf

German: Thiessen, A. & Haley, K.L. (2011). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, German Version (CHMIT-ge).  pdf

Greek: Pravasilis, P., & Haley, K.L. (2014). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, Greek Version (CHMIT-gr) pdf

Hindi: Salaria, R., & Haley, K. L. (2011). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, Hindi Version (CHMIT-h). pdf

Russian: Dolgova, Y. & Haley, K.L. (2011). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, Russian Version (CHMIT-r).  pdf

Spanish: Fischer, L. & Haley, K.L. (2014). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, Spanish Version (CHMIT-sp) pdf

Swedish: Gery, A. & Haley, K.L. (2011). Chapel Hill Multilingual Intelligibility Test, Swedish Version (CHMIT-sw).  pdf


Bibliography

Pravasilis, P., Fischer, L., & Haley, K.L. (2014). Adapting the CHMIT into Greek and Spanish. Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, Orlando, FL, Nov.

Haley, K. L., Jacks, A., & Truong, Y. (2013 Documenting intelligibility in speakers with aphasia: How many listeners do I need? Annual Convention of the American Speech Language Hearing Association, Chicago, IL.10024

Haley, K. L.., Roth, H., Grindstaff, E., & Jacks, A. ( 2011). Computer-mediated assessment of intelligibility in aphasia and apraxia of speech. Aphasiology. 25 (12), 1600-1620.

Haley, K. L., Jozefowicz, S., Dolgova, Y., Gery, A., Jacobson, M., and Peet, M. (2011). Development of a Multilingual Single Word Intelligibility Test, North Carolina Speech Hearing Language Association Spring Convention Greensboro, NC.

Grindstaff, E., Haley, K. L. (2009). Speech intelligibility in aphasic speakers: Use of auditory models. Annual Convention of the American Speech Language Hearing Association, New Orleans, LA.

Haley, K. L., (2008). Computer-mediated assessment of speech intelligibility in aphasia and AOS. Annual Convention of the American Speech Language Hearing Association, Chicago, IL.

Haley, K. L., (2007). Automated strategies for speech sample recording in aphasia. Annual Convention of the American Speech Language Hearing Association,  Boston, MA.

 

Acknowledgments

The development of the English monosyllabic word test was made possible by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD, R03DC006163). First authors of tests in languages other than English were students in the UNC Chapel Hill Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences. The contents of the tests are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or the UNC-CH Department of Allied Health Sciences.

 

Copyright and permission notice

Copyright (C) 2011 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, All rights reserved.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (“UNC”) and the developers of The Chapel Hill Assessment of Intelligibility Material (“Material”) give recipient (“Recipient”) permission to download and copy the Material for non-profit research and teaching purposes only provided that the following conditions are met:

1)        Recipient may use the Material for any purpose, EXCEPT for commercial benefit.

2)        Recipient will copy the Material only for his/her use.

3)        Recipient will not sell the Material.

4)        Recipient will not give the Material to any third party.

5)        Any party desiring a license to use the Material for commercial purposes shall contact: The Office of Technology Development at UNC at 919-966-3929.

THIS MATERIAL IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS, CONTRIBUTORS, AND THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT OWNER, CONTRIBUTORS OR THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS MATERIAL, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.