Adam Jacks, PhD

Assistant Professor
Phone: (919)-966-9464
Fax: (919)-966-0100
Email:
adam_jacks@med.unc.edu
CARD Website:
http://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/sphs/card

Education

  • PhD, The University of Texas at Austin 2006
  • MA, The University of Texas at Austin 2000
  • BA, Duke University 1998

Currently recruiting

  • Auditory masking effects on speech fluency in aphasia and apraxia of speech
    • We are currently recruiting stroke survivors with speech or language difficulties (i.e. aphasia) to participate in a research study investigating the effects of listening to noise on speech.
    • You or someone you know may be eligible if you have experienced an ischemic stroke at least six weeks ago and have speech or language problems resulting from the stroke.
    • This research study, “Auditory masking effects on speech fluency in aphasia and apraxia of speech” (IRB #10-0503), has been approved by the UNC Biomedical Institutional Review Board.
    • For more information or to schedule an appointment, please contact Adam Jacks, Ph.D., CCC-SLP at (919) 966-9464 or adam_jacks@med.unc.edu.

    Research/Clinical Interests

    • Neural substrates of speech motor control
    • Apraxia of speech
    • Hypokinetic "parkinsonian" dysarthria
    • Speech Acoustics and Perception

    Personal Statement

    Dr. Jacks’s training background includes doctoral work in communication sciences and disorders at The University of Texas at Austin, postdoctoral research in behavioral neuroimaging at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and clinical experience in long term acute care and outpatient rehabilitation settings. His research focuses on understanding the link between neuropathology and behavioral manifestations of neuromotor speech disorders. Experimental methodologies used in this work include neuroimaging techniques (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]), acoustic and perceptual analysis of speech, testing of categorical perception abilities, and experimental perturbation of speech production and perception (e.g. bite block speech, pitch and formant shifting). By studying the operational characteristics of motor control in normal and disordered speech, Dr. Jacks hopes to contribute knowledge that enables better prediction of speech abilities in individuals with neurological injury or disease and development of more effective treatments for persons with motor speech disorders.

    Courses Taught

    • SPHS 540 Speech Science
    • SPHS 744 Motor Speech Disorders

    Peer-reviewed publications

    Haley, K.L., Jacks, A. (2014). Single word intelligibility testing in aphasia: Alternate forms reliability, phonetic complexity, and word frequency. Aphasiology, 28(3) 320-337, doi: 10.1080/02687038.2013.855702.

    Haley, K.L., Jacks, A., Cunningham, K.T. (2012). Error variability and the differentiation between apraxia of speech and aphasia with phonemic paraphasia. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 56, 891-905. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0161), PMID:23275417.

    Haley, K.L., Jacks, A., de Riesthal, M., Abou-Khalil, R., Roth, H.L. (2012). Toward a Quantitative Basis for Assessment and Diagnosis of Apraxia of Speech. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 55(5), S1502-S1517. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0318), PMID: 23033444.

    Goldberg, S., Haley, K.L., Jacks, A. (2012). Script-training and Generalization for People with Aphasia. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 21(3), 222-238. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0056)

    Jacks, A., Haley, K.L., Scott, B.L., Jones, H.J. (2012). Auditory-perceptual analysis of dysarthria in bilateral  striatopallidodentate calcinosis (Fahr’s disease). Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 20(1), 29-34.

    Haley, K.L., Roth, H., Grindstaff, E., Jacks, A. (2011). Computer-mediated intelligibility testing in aphasia and AOS. Aphasiology, 25(12), 1600-1620. doi:10.1080/02687038.2011.628379

    Marquardt, T.P., Schneider, H.G., Jacks, A., (2010). Error prediction in acquired apraxia of speech. Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 18(4), 83-88.

    Jacks, A., Mathes, K.A., & Marquardt, T.P. (2010). Vowel acoustics in adults with apraxia of speech and aphasia. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 53(1), 61-74.

    Wright, D.L., Robin, D.A., Rhee, J-H., Vaculin, A., Jacks, A., Guenther, F.H., & Fox, P.T. (2009). Using the self-select paradigm to delineate the nature of speech motor programming. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 52(3), 755-765.

    Narayana, S., Jacks, A., Robin, D.A., Poizner, H., Zhang, W., Franklin, C., Liotti, M., Vogel, D., Fox, P.T. (2009). A non-invasive imaging approach to understanding speech changes following deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 18(2), 146-161.

    Robin, D.A., Jacks, A., Hageman, C., Clark, H.C., Woodworth, G. (2008). Visuomotor tracking abilities of speakers with apraxia of speech or conduction aphasia. Brain and Language, 106(2), 98-106.

    Jacks, A. (2008). Bite block vowel production in apraxia of speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 51(4), 898-913.

    Jacks, A., Marquardt, T.P., and Davis, B.L. (2006). Consonant and syllable structure patterns in childhood apraxia of speech: Developmental change in three children. Journal of Communication Disorders, 39, 424-441.

    Davis, B.L., Jacks, A., & Marquardt, T.P. (2005). Vowel patterns in developmental apraxia of speech: Three longitudinal case studies. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 19(4), 249-274.

    Marquardt, T.P., Jacks, A., & Davis, B.L. (2004). Token-to-token variability in developmental apraxia of speech: Three longitudinal case studies. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 18(2), 127-144.

    Marquardt, T.P., Sussman, H.M., Snow, T., & Jacks, A. (2002). The integrity of the syllable in developmental apraxia of speech. Journal of Communication Disorders, 35(1) 31-49.