Alumni Day Speakers

CELEBRATING GRADUATE RESEARCH PAST AND PRESENT

THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2013

10:30 AM - 4:00 PM

G202 MBRB

Distinguished Alumnus Speaker (11:15 - 11:45 AM)

The Seasons of Scientists’ Lives

Limbird

Lee Limbird, PhD

Dean, School of Natural Sciences - Fisk University

Dr. Limbird trained in the lab of Dr. Karl Blau and graduated with a degree in Biochemistry and Biophysics in 1973. She is currently Dean of the School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Business Administration at Fisk University. In addition, she serves as Coordinator of the Pre-Health Professions. Before joining Fisk University, Dr. Limbird served on the faculty of Duke University and for 25 years at Vanderbilt School of Medicine, including her role as Chair of Pharmacology and as the first Associate Vice Chancellor for Research. Dr. Limbird’s commitment to undergraduate learning as well as to biomedical research is evident in her service as a member of the Board of Trustees at the College of Wooster in Ohio.

Distinguished Alumnus Speaker (2:20 - 2:50 PM)

“Visualizing DNA Repair Enzymes Encountering Free Radical DNA Lesions”

Doublie

Sylvie Doublie, PhD

Professor, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics - University of Vermont

Dr. Doublié received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Biophysics in 1993 under the direction of Dr. Charles W. Carter. She did postdoctoral work with Dr. Stephen Cusack at the EMBL outstation in Grenoble and with Dr. Tom Ellenberger at Harvard Medical School where she solved the crystal structure of the ternary complex of T7 DNA polymerase. She joined the UVM faculty in 1998. Notably, she is a PEW scholar and the major thrust of her research program is to study these nucleic acid modifications in the context of the enzymes and proteins that generate and recognize them. Her goal is to answer the following questions: How does a DNA polymerase sense the presence of a DNA lesion? What role does sequence context play in translesion synthesis? What triggers the transfer of DNA to the editing site in the event of a base mispair?

Our goal is to answer the following questions: How does a DNA polymerase sense the presence of a DNA lesion? What role does sequence context play in translesion synthesis? What triggers the transfer of DNA to the editing site in the event of a base mispair?

Student Speaker (11:50 - 12:10 PM)

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“Monoubiquitination as a mechanism for the regulation of Ras signaling

Rachael Baker

Student - Sharon Campbell and Henrik Dohlman labs

Rachael received her Bachelors of Science from Calvin College. She is currently training in the labs of Sharon Campbell and Henrik Dohlman.

Student Speaker (1:55 - 2:15 PM)

Keith Miller

“T Cell Receptor Like Antibody Fragments for Type 1 Diabetes Imaging and Therapy

Keith Miller

Student - Ed Collins lab

Keith received his Bachelors of Science from Mount Union College and is currently training in the lab of Ed Collins.