2009

Zhang appointed as HHMI Investigator

Zhang appointed as HHMI Investigator

Dr. Yi Zhang, a Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics has been appointed an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

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Arrel Toews invited as the 2009 Whitehead Lecturer

Dr. Arrel Toews, Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics receives the honor of giving this year's Richard H. Whitehead Lecture.

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Arrel Toews receives 2009 Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

Arrel Toews receives 2009 Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

Congratulations to Arrel Toews, Research Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics for winning the Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, the highest campus-based recognition for teaching undergraduates.

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Aziz Sancar receives 2009 Distinguished Alumni Award from University of Texas, Dallas

Aziz Sancar receives 2009 Distinguished Alumni Award from University of Texas, Dallas

Congratulations to Dr. Aziz Sancar, Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, receives the highest honor bestowed upon alumni of the University of Texas, Dallas.

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Brian Strahl awarded the 2009 Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Prize

Brian Strahl awarded the 2009 Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Prize

Congratulations to Dr. Brian Strahl, Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, for receiving the 2009 Phillip and Ruth Hettleman Award for Outstanding Artistic and Scholarly Achievement.

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Grad Student Erin Heenan receives the 2009 Diane Harris Leadership Award

Grad Student Erin Heenan receives the 2009 Diane Harris Leadership Award

Congratulations to Erin Heenan, graduate student of Biochemistry & Biophysics for receiving the second annual Diane Harris Leadership award.

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Henrik Dohlman Selected as Member for NIH Study Section

Henrik Dohlman Selected as Member for NIH Study Section

Dr. Henrik Dohlman, a Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, has accepted an invitation to serve as a member of the Molecular & Integrative Signal Transduction Study Section with the NIH's Center for Scientific Review for a term beginning in August 2007 thru June 2009.

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Yi Zhang named as Kenan Distinguished Professor

Yi Zhang named as Kenan Distinguished Professor

Congratulations to Dr. Yi Zhang who has been named a Kenan Distinguished Professor effective July 1, 2009

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Looking at DNA through the Electron Microscope: the work of Jack Griffith

Looking at DNA through the Electron Microscope: the work of Jack Griffith

Congratulations to Dr. Jack Griffith, Distinguished Professor of Microbiology & Immunology and Biochemistry & Biophysics whose work was reprinted as a classic to commemorate the centennial of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

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Maness article featured on cover of Journal of Neuroscience

Maness article featured on cover of Journal of Neuroscience

Congratulations to researchers in the lab of Dr. Patricia Maness, Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, whose article "ALCAM Regulates Mediolateral Retinotopic Mapping in the Superior Colliculus" was featured on the cover of the December 16, 2009 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Possible drug target for obesity treatment a no-brainer

Researchers in Yi Zhang's group in the Dept. of Biochemistry & Biophysics at UNC-Chapel Hill have discovered a gene that when mutated causes obesity by dampening the body’s ability to burn energy while leaving appetite unaffected.

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UNC study supports role of circadian clock in response to chemotherapy

UNC study supports role of circadian clock in response to chemotherapy

A new study from Aziz Sancar's group in the Dept. of Biochemistry & Biophysics at UNC-Chapel Hill suggests that chemotherapy is most effective at certain times of day because that is when a particular enzyme system – one that can reverse the actions of chemotherapeutic drugs – is at its lowest levels in the body.

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Tinkering with the circadian clock can suppress cancer growth

Tinkering with the circadian clock can suppress cancer growth

Researchers in Aziz Sancar's group in the Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics at UNC-Chapel Hill have shown that disruption of the circadian clock – the internal time-keeping mechanism that keeps the body running on a 24-hour cycle – can slow the progression of cancer.

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UNC scientists win $1.6 million stimulus award to accelerate decoding of human genome

UNC scientists win $1.6 million stimulus award to accelerate decoding of human genome

Thursday, October 15, 2009 — Dr. Xian Chen, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, who along with Dr. Morgan Giddings, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology have been awarded a $1.6 million 2-year “Grand Opportunities” (GO) grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute.

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UNC study identifies genetic cause of most common form of breast cancer

UNC study identifies genetic cause of most common form of breast cancer

Monday, May 11, 2009 — Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that defects in one tumor-suppressor gene, called p18, may override the rest, eventually leading to cancer.

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