Faculty News

UNC scientists turn human skin cells into insulin-producing stem cells

UNC scientists turn human skin cells into insulin-producing stem cells

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill in the Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics have transformed cells from human skin into cells that produce insulin, the hormone used to treat diabetes.

UNC scientists turn human skin cells into insulin-producing stem cells - Read More…

Brian Strahl receives first ever EUREKA award from NIH

Brian Strahl receives first ever EUREKA award from NIH

Congratulations to Dr. Brian Strahl, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, for receiving a new EUREKA award from the NIH "for exceptionally innovative research projects that could have an extraordinarily significant impact on many areas of science."

Brian Strahl receives first ever EUREKA award from NIH - Read More…

Structure and function of photolyase and in vivo enzymology - 50th anniversary

Structure and function of photolyase and in vivo enzymology - 50th anniversary

Dr. Aziz Sancar, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, has dedicated his recent Journal of Biological Chemistry publication to Dr. Claud S. Rupert, his PhD advisor. This paper signifies the 50th anniversary of the discovery of photolyase by Dr. Rupert and his colleagues, an event marking the beginning of the DNA repair field. This anniversary coincides with Dr. Rupert's 90th birthday. Congratulations to all!

Structure and function of photolyase and in vivo enzymology - 50th anniversary - Read More…

Yi Zhang receives the first Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award

Yi Zhang receives the first Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award

Congratulations to Dr. Yi Zhang, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, who was awarded the first Hyman L. Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award

Yi Zhang receives the first Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award - Read More…

Clumps of red and white blood cells may contribute to sickle cell disease

Clumps of red and white blood cells may contribute to sickle cell disease

Research in the Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, by Dr. Julia Brittain, Research Assitant Professor and Dr. Leslie Parise, Professor and Chair have shown that blood from sickle cell patients also contains clumps, or aggregates, of red and white blood cells that may contribute to the blockages.

Clumps of red and white blood cells may contribute to sickle cell disease - Read More…

Recent Research Provides New Interpretations of the Genetic Code

Recent Research Provides New Interpretations of the Genetic Code

Dr. Charles Carter, Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, in the April issue of the Nature journal Heredity, reviews two recent papers that present new insights on the codon table and provide an alternative view on the origins of the genetic code.

Recent Research Provides New Interpretations of the Genetic Code - Read More…

Yi Zhang Ranked by Thomson Scientific in Top Ten Authors with High Impact Papers

Yi Zhang Ranked by Thomson Scientific in Top Ten Authors with High Impact Papers

Congratulations to Dr. Yi Zhang, Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, who ranked 7th worldwide in a study performed by Thomson Scientific assessing high-impact research in molecular biology and genetics.

Yi Zhang Ranked by Thomson Scientific in Top Ten Authors with High Impact Papers - Read More…

Arrel Toews is an Invited Lecturer for USMLE Review

Arrel Toews is an Invited Lecturer for USMLE Review

Dr. Arrel Toews, Research Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, has been invited by second year medical students at UNC-Chapel Hill to provide a review of Biochemistry to prepare them for their USMLE Step I exams.

Arrel Toews is an Invited Lecturer for USMLE Review - Read More…

Computer Simulations Point to Key Molecular Basis of Cystic Fibrosis

Dr. Nikolay Dokholyan, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics and colleagues at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have identified a key molecular mechanism that may account for the development of cystic fibrosis.

Computer Simulations Point to Key Molecular Basis of Cystic Fibrosis - Read More…