Faculty News

UNC study identifies genetic cause of most common form of breast cancer

UNC study identifies genetic cause of most common form of breast cancer

Monday, May 11, 2009 — Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that defects in one tumor-suppressor gene, called p18, may override the rest, eventually leading to cancer.

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Arrel Toews receives 2009 Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

Arrel Toews receives 2009 Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

Congratulations to Arrel Toews, Research Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics for winning the Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, the highest campus-based recognition for teaching undergraduates.

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Possible drug target for obesity treatment a no-brainer

Researchers in Yi Zhang's group in the Dept. of Biochemistry & Biophysics at UNC-Chapel Hill have discovered a gene that when mutated causes obesity by dampening the body’s ability to burn energy while leaving appetite unaffected.

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Tinkering with the circadian clock can suppress cancer growth

Tinkering with the circadian clock can suppress cancer growth

Researchers in Aziz Sancar's group in the Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics at UNC-Chapel Hill have shown that disruption of the circadian clock – the internal time-keeping mechanism that keeps the body running on a 24-hour cycle – can slow the progression of cancer.

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UNC study supports role of circadian clock in response to chemotherapy

UNC study supports role of circadian clock in response to chemotherapy

A new study from Aziz Sancar's group in the Dept. of Biochemistry & Biophysics at UNC-Chapel Hill suggests that chemotherapy is most effective at certain times of day because that is when a particular enzyme system – one that can reverse the actions of chemotherapeutic drugs – is at its lowest levels in the body.

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Without enzymes, biological reaction essential to life takes 2.3 billion years: UNC study

Without enzymes, biological reaction essential to life takes 2.3 billion years: UNC study

Dr. Richard Wolfenden, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, and member of the National Academy of Sciences, and co-author Charles Lewis, PhD publish a report in the November issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences showing that without enzymes speeding the process, it would take 2.3 bilion years to complete vital biological transformation.

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UNC scientists turn human skin cells into insulin-producing stem cells

UNC scientists turn human skin cells into insulin-producing stem cells

Researchers at UNC-Chapel Hill in the Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics have transformed cells from human skin into cells that produce insulin, the hormone used to treat diabetes.

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Brian Strahl receives first ever EUREKA award from NIH

Brian Strahl receives first ever EUREKA award from NIH

Congratulations to Dr. Brian Strahl, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, for receiving a new EUREKA award from the NIH "for exceptionally innovative research projects that could have an extraordinarily significant impact on many areas of science."

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Structure and function of photolyase and in vivo enzymology - 50th anniversary

Structure and function of photolyase and in vivo enzymology - 50th anniversary

Dr. Aziz Sancar, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, has dedicated his recent Journal of Biological Chemistry publication to Dr. Claud S. Rupert, his PhD advisor. This paper signifies the 50th anniversary of the discovery of photolyase by Dr. Rupert and his colleagues, an event marking the beginning of the DNA repair field. This anniversary coincides with Dr. Rupert's 90th birthday. Congratulations to all!

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Yi Zhang receives the first Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award

Yi Zhang receives the first Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award

Congratulations to Dr. Yi Zhang, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, who was awarded the first Hyman L. Battle Distinguished Cancer Research Award

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Clumps of red and white blood cells may contribute to sickle cell disease

Clumps of red and white blood cells may contribute to sickle cell disease

Research in the Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, by Dr. Julia Brittain, Research Assitant Professor and Dr. Leslie Parise, Professor and Chair have shown that blood from sickle cell patients also contains clumps, or aggregates, of red and white blood cells that may contribute to the blockages.

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Recent Research Provides New Interpretations of the Genetic Code

Recent Research Provides New Interpretations of the Genetic Code

Dr. Charles Carter, Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, in the April issue of the Nature journal Heredity, reviews two recent papers that present new insights on the codon table and provide an alternative view on the origins of the genetic code.

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