Recent News

Grad Student Jaime Campbell receives 2013 Dissertation Completion Award
Congratulations to Jaime Campbell, a graduate student of Biochemistry & Biophysics, for receiving the 2013 Dissertation Completion Award.
UNC researchers engineer 'protein switch' to dissect role of cancer’s key players
In the first application of this approach, the UNC researchers showed how a protein called Src kinase influences the way cells extend and move, a previously unknown role that is consistent with the protein’s ties to tumor progression and metastasis.
Alumni Research Day is Thursday, May 16th
The Department is featuring a full day of events including invited alumni talks by distinguished researchers, Dr. Lee Limbird (Dean of School of Natural Sciences at Fisk University) and Dr. Sylvie Doublie (Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Biology at University of Vermont), talks by our current students, a poster session, and a panel discussion by alumni on career paths and more. Learn more and join us!
Dr. Gerald Crabtree hosted by students for a distinguished lecture
Biochemistry and Biophysics graduate students host Gerald Crabtree, MD for a special lecture on "Chromatin Regulation: New Concepts and Methods"
Two biochemistry and biophysics grad students awarded NSF Fellowships
Congratulations to Cassandra Hayne and Rebecca Pollet for receiving Predoctoral Fellowships from the National Science Foundation!
Zhang awarded March of Dimes Starter Scholar award
Congratulations to Dr. Qi Zhang, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, who has received the 2013 Basil O’Connor Starter Scholar Research Award from the March of Dimes Foundation.
Grad Student Eliza Peterson receives a 2013 GEAB Impact Award
"Eliza's novel inhibitors will have a significant impact on the long-term efficacy of different antibiotics," said advisor Scott Singleton, PhD. Congratulations to Eliza on her achievement!
New mechanism for cancer progression discovered by UNC and Harvard researchers
The protein Ras plays an important role in cellular growth control. Researchers have focused on the protein because mutations in its gene are found in more than 30 percent of all cancers, making it the most prevalent human oncogene.
Wang discovers information from outside the genome influences stem cell differentiation, cancer development
Research from the Wang and Strahl labs has shed new light on how epigenetic signals may function together to determine the ultimate fate of a stem cell.
Charles Carter elected as 2012 AAAS Fellow
Congratulations to Dr. Charles Carter, Jr., Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, who was elected as a 2012 AAAS fellow.