CFEP Training

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The Child/Family Evaluation Program (formerly known as the Child Forensic Evaluation Program) has now replaced the Child Mental Health Evaluation Program (CMHEP) as of 6/30/06.

Doctoral-level mental health professionals licensed in the state of North Carolina are eligible to serve as CFEP examiners.  Individuals with masters-level degrees in psychology, social work, or related clinical fields typically serve as associate examiners with varying levels of responsibility in the evaluation process.  To become a rostered examiner or associate examiner with CFEP, mental health professionals must take the two-day workshop entitled Brief Child Forensic Evaluations in Cases of Alleged Abuse (see below for more information).

The CFE Program represents an improvement and update of the CMHE Program in the following ways:

  1. Examiners are required to participate in a two-day workshop on brief child/family evaluations for initial credentialing in the program;
  2. The use of forensic standards appropriate to brief child/ family evaluations is emphasised;
  3. The fee structure has been revised (i.e. $100 per hour for up to 15 hours of professional time per evaluation).

All examiners are required to submit documentation of a minimum of 10 C.E. hours in the area of child abuse or neglect every two years.  This continuing education requirement can be fulfilled in a number of ways such as conferences, training workshops, on-line or home-study C.E. programs and the CFEP coursepak of readings:

1) Conferences and training workshops. The number of C.E. units received is set by the conference or workshop organizer. Those who re-attend the initial credentialing workshop “Brief Child/Family Evaluations in Cases of Alleged Abuse” will be given 3 C.E. hours.

2) CFEP Coursepak. Credit for 10 C.E. hours will be given for reading 12 of 15 articles (Honor system). Please call 919-843-9365 or e-mail cmep@med.unc.edu to request the coursepak be sent to you.

3) On-line or “home study” C.E. programs. The number of C.E. units received is determined by the program sponsor.

4) Suggested CFEP reading list. Credit for 7 C.E. hours will be given for each book and 2 C.E. hours will be given for each journal article that is read (Honor system.)

Suggestion:  The APSAC Handbook on Child Maltreatment, which can be ordered here.

5) Peer consultation. Up to 6 hours of the biennial 10 C.E. unit requirement can be fulfilled through peer consultation, with a maximum of 3 hours credited per case. Credit is given for participation in either the consultant or consultee roles involving case review and feedback on the evaluation process as well as the report for a current CFEP evaluation. Consultants must be selected from the list of rostered CFEP examiners and cannot be a current supervisor or consultee. Individual examiners electing the C.E. option are expected to make their own peer consultation arrangements. Our office will provide a list of rostered examiners.


Upcoming Training Opportunities

(Click on a link to jump to details of a particular workshop):

Brief Child Forensic Evaluations In Cases of Alleged Abuse (no dates available at this time)

Child Forensic Interviewing:  Introduction to the RADAR Interview Protocol (no dates available at this time)

Understanding and Treating Child Sexual Behavior Problems (no dates available at this time)

31st National Symposium on Child Abuse (March 23-26, 2015 in Huntsville, Alabama)

Dissociative Disorders Through the Lifespan (no dates available at this time)

CHILD FORENSIC INTERVIEWING AT AGE 30 Taking Stock of Where We Are
(no dates available at this time)

Assessing Allegations of Child Sexual Abuse: Should Accepted Practice Be Redefined in Light of New Research? (no dates available at this time)

Learning Collaborative in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (Various dates and locations)

 

BRIEF CHILD FORENSIC EVALUATIONS IN CASES OF ALLEGED ABUSE

The initial credentialing workshop entitled "Brief Child/ Family Evaluations In Cases of Alleged Abuse" is scheduled for the following locations:

There are no future dates available for this workshop, but we will update the website as soon as we have them! 
Here is a description of our last workshop:


May 29-30, 2014

Wake AHEC
Raleigh, NC

Registration here

 

 

 

Description:
This two-day workshop is designed primarily for mental health and social services professionals who conduct assessments of child maltreatment allegations, including professionals who have an interest in becoming rostered evaluators in the North Carolina Child/Family Evaluation Program (CFEP). The workshop will focus on distinctions between forensic and clinical evaluations, common components of the forensic evaluation process, appropriate standards of practice, and relevant ethical issues. Workshop methods will include didactic presentations and case discussions. A major component of the workshop will be a small group exercise that involves planning and conducting a mock evaluation based on the case characteristics provided.

Audience:
Psychologists, DSS Child Protective Service workers, counselors, social workers, therapists, case managers, and other professionals who conduct assessments of child maltreatment allegations, including professionals who have an interest in becoming rostered evaluators in the North Carolina Child/Family Evaluation Program (CFEP)

Objectives:
1. Discuss different evaluation models, including the distinction between forensic and clinical evaluations
2. Describe the appropriate components of a brief child forensic evaluation in cases of alleged abuse
3. Plan a brief forensic evaluation based on case characteristics
4. Discuss ethical guidelines and multiple role issues in conducting evaluations in cases of alleged abuse



Child Forensic Interviewing:
Introduction to the RADAR Interview Protocol

There are no future dates available for this workshop, but we will update the website as soon as we have them! 
Here is a description of our last workshop:

April 30 - May 2, 2014 Greensboro AHEC Info and Registration here

About the Workshop

Child forensic interviewing in cases of alleged abuse has become an increasingly specialized field. Part of the specialization is the development and use of empirically-based, structured interview protocols. This three-day workshop provides an introduction to the RADAR Interview Protocol. RADAR (Recognizing Abuse Disclosure types And Responding) is a highly structured, evidence-based forensic interview for children (minimum age 5 years) and adolescents who are being assessed for possible sexual or physical abuse. RADAR is a modification of the NICHD Investigative Interview Protocol developed by Michael Lamb and his colleagues while at the National Institute on Child Health and Development. Research suggests that the original NICHD protocol is most effective with children and adolescents who are in the active disclosure phase. The RADAR modifications involve enhancements to improve the effectiveness of the NICHD protocol for children and adolescents in other disclosure categories, while maintaining fidelity to the design and structure of the original protocol. The workshop will include opportunities to practice the interview with other workshop participants.

Class size limited. Register soon!

Objectives
Upon completion of this workshop, participants should increase their ability to:
Review the conceptual and historical rationale for the RADAR Interview Protocol
Describe how to use the RADAR Interview Protocol in interviewing children about sexual and physical abuse
Develop a familiarity with the RADAR Protocol through hands-on, role-play practice, as well as implement these skills in their daily practice.

Target Audience

A. Beginning child forensic interviewers in Child Protective Services, Law Enforcement, Mental Health and related fields

B. More experienced child forensic interviewers who want to strengthen their interview skills

C. Rostered evaluators in the Child/Family Evaluation Program as well as eligible psychologists


 

31st National Symposium on Child Abuse


March 23-26, 2015
Von Braun Center
700 Monroe Street
Huntsville, Alabama 35801

Information here

 


 

Understanding and Treating Child Sexual Behavior Problems


There are no future dates available for this workshop, but we will update the website as soon as we have them! 
Here is a description of our last workshop:

April 23, 2013
Pitt County Agricultural Extension Auditorium
403 Government Circle
Greenville, North Carolina

Brochure Here

This workshop is designed for therapists and child protective service workers dealing with young children who have sexual behaviors. The goal is to help the clinician understand the possible etiologies of the behaviors and implications for treatment. The presentation will be a combination of theory, research and practical interventions.


Dissociative Disorders Through the Lifespan

There are no future dates available for this workshop, but we will update the website as soon as we have them! Here is a description of our last workshop:

May 14, 2013, 9:00 am – 4:45 pm
Deacon Tower at BB&T Field, Winston-Salem, NC
Description Here
Brochure Here

This workshop provides a comprehensive introduction to the history, phenomenology, diagnosis and treatment of dissociative disorders, with focus on dissociative identity disorder (DID) (formerly multiple personality disorder). Discussion addresses: 1) history of dissociative disorders; 2) trauma, memory and dissociation; 3) assessment of childhood through adulthood dissociative disorders, including signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, and assessment instruments; 4) stages of treatment of DID including general as well as autonomous self-state specific treatment interventions; 5) transgenerational issues including assessment and therapeutic approaches with families; 6) out of home interventions, and 7) psychopharmacologic interventions. Target Audience: This workshop will be beneficial to social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, school counselors and other mental health professionals treating adults, adolescents or children. Clinicians who treat adults will learn adult presentations of DID and issues in their assessment and treatment. Child and family therapists will understand childhood symptoms through understanding how adults present with DID. Clinicians will learn appropriate steps to take with a family member with DID.

 


 

CHILD FORENSIC INTERVIEWING AT AGE 30
Taking Stock of Where We Are

There are no future dates available for this workshop, but we will update the website as soon as we have them! 
Here is a description of our last workshop:


The field of child forensic interviewing in cases of alleged child sexual abuse has recently turned 30 years old.  This workshop will discuss the history of the field of child forensic interviewing, current areas of consensus and division, proposed "reforms" to remake the field, and challenges to objectivity in current practice. 

Topics include:

  • Child forensic interviewing from the beginning
  • Innovation, consensus and division
  • The beginning of the end of forensic  child interviewing?
  • Objectivity and bias in child sexual abuse investigations


Presenter:  Mark D. Everson, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


ASSESSING ALLEGATIONS OF CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE: Should Accepted Practice Be Redefined in Light of New Research?

There are no future dates available for this workshop, but we will update the website as soon as we have them!  Here is a description of our last workshop:

June 2, 2011

Eastern AHEC
Greenville, NC

Brochure here
Registration here


 

 

About the Workshop:

Current practice in the assessment of allegations of child sexual abuse is under challenge. Commonly accepted methods in forensic and diagnostic evaluations and child protective service investigations are now being criticized as unreliable, invalid, and even unethical, based on new research and legal rulings.

This workshop will examine a number of these challenges and criticisms and address the question of whether, and in what ways, current practice should evolve as a result. Specific topics for discussion include: the implications of new research on child forensic interviewing; the use of behavioral symptoms, like sexual acting out, in decision making; the apparent limited reliability and validity of professional judgments about abuse; and recent limitations on the role of the evaluator in court. This workshop is designed for professionals across a number of disciplines who conduct evaluations or investigations of allegations of child sexual abuse. It is especially relevant to rostered examiners in the North Carolina Child/Family Evaluation Program (CFEP).

Objectives

Upon completion of this workshop, participants should increase their ability to effectively care for clients by being able to:

Relate an overview of recent research that is being used to challenge the validity of current practice in the evaluation and investigation of CSA allegations
Discuss counter-arguments or recommendations for modifying practice in response to recent challenges and criticisms
Discuss the implications of recent court rulings like Crawford for the evaluation process List service exclusions; as well as implement these skills in their daily practice.

Target Audience
This workshop will be valuable for psychologists, counselors, social workers, therapists, case managers, attorneys, and other professionals.

 


 

 

19th Annual Symposium on Child Abuse and Neglect & CACNC Child Medical Training

Fall 2014
Lake Junaluska, near Waynesville, NC
Watch the Child Advocacy Centers of NC website for information on the 2014 Symposium:  cacnc.org

 


 

Learning Collaborative in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Since 2006, NC CTP has successfully conducted six Learning Collaboratives in TF - CBT. We have learned that clinicians achieve the greatest training success when they participate as a member of a team, supported by a Senior Leader. Thus, the Class of 2012/2013 will include: ~ 12 teams, comprised of affiliated indi- viduals (5 clinicians + 1 senior leader). Affiliation can be based upon: common employer/agency, new or established referral networks, and/or other profes- sional relationships. When reviewing applications, preference will be given to committed teams with a highly supportive Senior Leader, and at least one clini- cal supervisor among the clinician - trainees.

Information Here