Women projected to outnumber men in NC through 2020

The female population will continue to outnumber the male population through at least 2020 according to the 2014 North Carolina Women's Health Report Card released May 12 by the University of North Carolina’s at Chapel Hill’s Center for Women's Health Research (CWHR).

The female population will continue to outnumber the male population through at least 2020 according to the 2014 North Carolina Women's Health Report Card released May 12 by the University of North Carolina’s at Chapel Hill’s Center for Women's Health Research (CWHR).

The report, using data obtained by UNC’s Carolina Population Center (CPC), is a progress report on the health and health care needs of the state’s 5+ million women.

The North Carolina female population, in 2012, was at 5,011,884 and is projected to grow to 5,456,980 by the year 2020. This represents a 9 percent increase. In 2012 the average age of the state’s women was 39.14. By 2020 it will be 40.4. The largest percent of women fall within the 35 to 54 and 55 and above categories for age. Hispanic women have the state’s youngest median demographic at age 25.2, while Caucasian women are the oldest at a median age of 42.1 in 2012.

Tracking demographics enables businesses, foundations, government agencies, schools, not-for-profit organizations, and many more adequately plan care and services for the state’s current and future population.

“Hispanics, other race individuals, and Asians are much younger, and this will be reflected in the population of children, largely because these women are younger and more likely to be in childbearing years” said Dr. Rebecca Tippett, Director of Carolina Demography at CPC.  “North Carolina’s female population is experiencing the same demographic trends occurring in the population at large: an increasing concentration in urban/metropolitan areas with population decline in rural counties; increasing diversity; and population aging.”

A more complete breakdown of the demographics and project demographics of North Carolina women may be found at www.med.unc.edu/cwhr.

The report card is distributed to medical and public health professionals, policy makers, researchers and women's health advocacy groups throughout the state. Data was compiled from state health behavior surveys, vital statistics, disease reporting systems, and US Bureau of Labor Statistics and Census Bureau reports.  Preventive health, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, perinatal health, mental health and substance abuse are the key measures examined. The biennial health report is the only one of its kind in North Carolina.

CWHR utilized the services of Carolina Demography to collect the data found within the report card. Carolina Demography is a service of CPC that focuses on population change. They provide a full array of demographic services for North Carolina businesses, foundations, government agencies, schools, not-for-profit organizations, and many more.

The mission of CWHR is to improve women’s health through research by focusing on diseases, disorders and conditions that affect women only, women predominately, and/or women differently than men. Research efforts that require the most attention are identified through the collection and analysis of data for the report card. Current areas of research targeted by the Center include perinatal health, cancers affecting women, obesity, diabetes, women’s cardiovascular health, women’s mental health and substance abuse.