May 26 - 2

In this Issue:

Core Lab memo: Timed and random urines requiring special collection requirements

Micro Lab Numbered Memo #135 (RMSF Serologic Testing)

Probiotic agents no longer available within UNC Hospitals

BCBSNC: Important information on use of single use medications

Gentamicin Injection Shortage - Please Use Tobramycin as Alternative When Possible

 


Core Lab memo:  Timed and random urines requiring special collection requirements

Effective May 18, the Referral Testing Laboratory will change the collection requirements of many of its urine tests. These changes are being implemented in an effort to provide greater patient safety during collection and to maximize the number of tests that can be performed on a single 24-hour collection. Please read the attached memo for full details.

 


Micro Lab Numbered Memo #135 (RMSF Serologic Testing)

Effective May 23, Immunology will no longer offer latex agglutination (LA) testing for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) antibody.  The laboratory will continue to perform the Indirect Fluorescent Antibody (IFA) on all sera. Please read the attached memo for full details.

 


Probiotic agents no longer available within UNC Hospitals

Lactobacillus GG (Culturelle), a probiotic agent, will no longer be available from the UNC Hospitals Department of Pharmacy beginning immediately.  The P&T Committee has removed this agent from the Formulary. The P&T Committee is prohibiting use of probiotic agents of any kind in patients hospitalized at UNC Health Care.  Physicians should feel free to recommend probiotic agents for patients to use at home, however, these agents must be discontinued if the patient is admitted to the hospital.  Please read the attached memo for full details.

 


BCBSNC: Important information on use of single use medications

On 8 April 2011, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina recommended that “providers administer the unused portion of a single-use vial …to another patient when clinically appropriate.”  The attached memo describes why this practice is hazardous and is inconsistent with current CDC policy.


Gentamicin Injection Shortage - Please Use Tobramycin as Alternative When Possible

Gentamicin injection is in short supply.  The shortage started with the pediatric strength (10 mg/mL) but now has extended to include adult concentration as well.

Please utilize tobramycin instead of gentamicin whenever possible.

 

Situations in which it may be appropriate to continue to use gentamicin:

Use for synergy in treatment of endocarditis (dosing typically 1 mg/kg q 8 or 1.5 mg/kg q 12 h)

Use for synergy for other gram positive infections

Rarely, a patient may have an organism resistant to tobramycin, but not gentamicin

For other conditions, including gram negative infections, please use tobramycin instead of gentamicin.