NRSA Primary Care Research Fellowship

Meet the NRSA Primary Care Research Fellows in the Department of Family Medicine.

The NRSA Primary Care Research Fellowship aims to train primary care physicians for academic careers that emphasize research. The two-to three-year fellowship provides participants with the knowledge, skills and experience to pursue an individual research program. Fellows establish a research foundation through course work in the various departments of UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and seminars in the School of Medicine’s NC TraCS Translational and Clinical Research Curriculum, and reinforced through fellows’ research projects, weekly works-in-progress seminars, and mentoring by clinical and research faculty.

The fellowship is based in the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, a large, multi-disciplinary research unit on campus. To learn more, visit the fellowship page here.

UNC Family Medicine currently has two NRSA fellows within the department. 

 

Chineme Enyioha, MDChineme Enyioha
Family Medicine, 1st Year

Dr. Enyioha is from Louisville, KY but grew up in Nigeria. She received her undergraduate degree at William Carey University in Hattiesburg, MS and her medical degree from Yale University.  She completed residency training in Family Medicine at University of Virginia.

Research Interests: Health disparities at a local and global level, chronic disease management with patient engagement.


Jonathan Yun, MD
Family Medicine, 2nd YearJonathon Yun

Dr, Yun earned a degree in Psychology from the University of California, San Diego, and worked as a language and behavioral therapist for special-needs children after college. He decided to pursue a medical career and completed a post-baccalaureate training program before attending medical school at Saint Louis University. He completed his Family Medicine residency at the Ohio State University.

Research Interests: behavioral interventions for managing chronic disease, patient-physician communication, community-based interventions