Educational Activities

BLS | ACLS | Airway/Pediatric

 

All grading and evaluations for IAC are tracked using One45.

Basic Life Support (BLS) Certification:

During the Transition Course for Third Year Medical Students (occurs the last week in June) the entire Third year class will be given American Heart Association “Healthcare Provider” BLS.  This will occur over a three day period.   On each day one third of the class receives BLS training.  That third is further subdivided into smaller groups that maintains an 8:1 student to instructor ratio (maximum).

This is a four hour hands-on training experience where the students will learn BLS skills (See Objectives for list.)

This training culminates in practical testing of the ability to perform the above skills using AHA scoring.  Following completion of practical exam the student will take the AHA written test to complete this training.  Students must achieve an 84 or higher on the written test to achieve certification.  Remediation and retesting are available for students not passing either the practical or the written test.   Students who fail both sessions are required to retake the course.

This session must be and is taught by AHA certified BLS Instructors.

 


Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Certification:

During the Medicine Clerkship, (Inpatient Medicine), the students will rotate out to do their ACLS training for IAC.  This training is taught in a group of up to eight students as a single class over two days.

ACLS is aimed at the adult patient population and represents the latest resuscitation science best practices.  BLS is the foundation of ACLS. This course begins with review and demonstration of BLS skills for the adult patient.  (See Objectives for list of additional ACLS skills practiced in this session.)

Students will build on that foundation and learn advanced cardiac and stroke care through a series of patient simulations.  Simulations are group by algorithm.  After an algorithm is mastered, the group will advance to the next algorithm.  Once all algorithms have been mastered, the group will then go through a series of patient simulations that combines several algorithms in a single patient scenario.  Throughout this time the students will perform each of the various roles required in resuscitation.  Students are expected to demonstrate leadership both by stepping forward and volunteering for the Team Leader role and through appropriate performance of that role.

The students complete this hands-on training by practical exam in the role of Team Leader.  The exam is a patient simulation that is based on an actual patient case and involves utilizing multiple algorithms.   Students are graded on both content (patient care rendered) and on leadership using AHA scoring.

After the practical exam has been completed the students must take the AHA written exam.  Students must achieve an 84 or higher on the written test to achieve certification.  Remediation and retesting are available for students not passing either the practical or the written test.   Students who fail both sessions are required to retake the course.

This session must be and is taught by AHA certified ACLS Instructor.

 

 


 

Combined Airway, Respiration, & Ventilation Management And Pediatric Skills Session

During the Neurology Clerkship, students will rotate out in a group of ~ 6 students during the either the first or fourth week of the Clerkship.  This is a four hour session that combines Airway Management and Pediatric Skills Sessions into a single block of training.

During the first hour the students receive two consecutive lectures that covers both ‘Anesthesia  Basics’ and ‘Airway Anatomy and Management’.   At that time the group is divided in half with half of the group continuing with airway, respiration and ventilation management with the focus primarily on the adult patient.  Students receive demonstration and practice utilizing various trainers to learn these skills.  This session includes bag mask ventilation by students on each other.

The second group does Pediatric Skills that covers  pediatric airway, respiration & ventilation, and pediatric vascular access skills.  Students receive demonstration and practice utilizing various trainers to learn these skills. This session culminates in students placing peripheral IVs in each other.  “

For a list of skills taught in this session see “Objectives”.

Currently, grading for this session is by participation and is pass/fail.   Testing for this session is being piloted and expected to be incorporated into next year’s course as part of the grade for IAC.