Neuroscience News

Freiwald, Tsao win 18th Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize

Freiwald, Tsao win 18th Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize

The UNC School of Medicine has awarded the 18th Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize to Winrich Freiwald, PhD, of The Rockefeller University and Doris Y. Tsao, PhD, of the California Institute of Technology for the discovery of brain mechanisms of face recognition. Freiwald and Tsao will visit Chapel Hill on April 12 to receive the prize – a $20,000 award – and give a lecture on their work at 3 p.m. in room G202 in the Medical Biomolecular Research Building (MBRB), with a reception to follow.

Freiwald, Tsao win 18th Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize - Read More…

Hyejung Won & Jason Stein Publish in Cell

Hyejung Won & Jason Stein Publish in Cell

Jason Stein and Hyejung Won recently published an article in Cell on the dynamic landscape of open chromatin during human neurogenesis.

Hyejung Won & Jason Stein Publish in Cell - Read More…

UNC Scientists Take a Big Step toward Building a Better Opioid

UNC Scientists Take a Big Step toward Building a Better Opioid

In a paper published in Cell, UNC School of Medicine researchers led by Bryan Roth, MD, PhD, show how to activate only one kind of brain receptor vital for pain relief. This receptor is not involved in addiction or respiratory depression that leads to death – the most severe side effects of opioid use.

UNC Scientists Take a Big Step toward Building a Better Opioid - Read More…

Damaris Lorenzo, PhD, Awarded National Ataxia Foundation Young Investigator Award for Spinocerebellar Ataxias Research

Damaris Lorenzo, PhD, Awarded National Ataxia Foundation Young Investigator Award for Spinocerebellar Ataxias Research

Damaris Lorenzo, PhD, an assistant professor of Cell Biology and Physiology in the UNC School of Medicine and a Neuroscience Curriculum Faculty Member, has been awarded a grant from the National Ataxia Foundation. This one-year grant will allow the Lorenzo lab to study how the regulation of cerebellar development and connectivity by β-spectrins is implicated in the pathophysiology of spinocerebellar ataxias.

Damaris Lorenzo, PhD, Awarded National Ataxia Foundation Young Investigator Award for Spinocerebellar Ataxias Research - Read More…

Ben Philpot, PhD Awarded Rett Syndrome Research Trust Grant

Ben Philpot, PhD Awarded Rett Syndrome Research Trust Grant

This new project, aimed at reactivating MECP2, has been funded by the Rett Syndrome Research Trust.

Ben Philpot, PhD Awarded Rett Syndrome Research Trust Grant - Read More…

Hiroyuki Kato, PhD, Awarded Whitehall Foundation Grant

Hiroyuki Kato, PhD, Awarded Whitehall Foundation Grant

Hiroyuki Kato, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry in the UNC School of Medicine and a member of the UNC Neuroscience Center, has been awarded a grant from the Whitehall Foundation. He will receive $225,000.00 over three years to study the mechanisms underlying spectro-temporal integration of sounds in our brains.

Hiroyuki Kato, PhD, Awarded Whitehall Foundation Grant - Read More…

Mark Zylka, PhD, Named American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow

Mark Zylka, PhD, Named American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow

UNC Neuroscience Center's Director, Mark Zylka, was one of three professors from UNC-Chapel Hill, and among 396 new fellows in total, who were recognized by their peers for their distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications.

Mark Zylka, PhD, Named American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow - Read More…

Garret Stuber, PhD, Named Co-Recipient of the Waletzky Award

Garret Stuber, PhD, Named Co-Recipient of the Waletzky Award

The Jacob P. Waletzky Award is given to a young scientist (within 15 years of his/her PhD or MD degree) whose independent research has led to significant conceptual and empirical contributions to the understanding of drug addiction.

Garret Stuber, PhD, Named Co-Recipient of the Waletzky Award - Read More…

Song Lab Publishes on Discovery of a Long-Distance Brain Circuit in Cell Stem Cell

Song Lab Publishes on Discovery of a Long-Distance Brain Circuit in Cell Stem Cell

In a new study published in Cell Stem Cell, UNC School of Medicine neuroscientist Juan Song and colleagues discovered a long-distance brain circuit that controls the production of new neurons in the hippocampus. This story is featured as the Cover Story in the current issue of Cell Stem Cell.

Song Lab Publishes on Discovery of a Long-Distance Brain Circuit in Cell Stem Cell - Read More…

 Graham Diering, PhD, Announced as Finalist for the Eppendorf Science Prize for Neurobiology

Graham Diering, PhD, Announced as Finalist for the Eppendorf Science Prize for Neurobiology

Graham Diering, PhD, announced as a finalist for the 2017 Eppendorf Science Prize for Neurobiology. The prize winning essay on synaptic plasticity during sleep is published in the Oct. 27, 2017 issue of Science. Graham is a new faculty member in Cell Biology & Physiology and will continue his work on molecular mechanisms by which sleep supports cognitive function.

Graham Diering, PhD, Announced as Finalist for the Eppendorf Science Prize for Neurobiology - Read More…

Garret Stuber, PhD, Receives NIH Merit Award

Garret Stuber, PhD, Receives NIH Merit Award

Garret Stuber, PhD, received an NIH Merit Award for his NIH grant to study midbrain neural circuits that orchestrate cue-reward associations. Merit awards provide long-term, stable support to investigators whose research competence and productivity are distinctly superior and who are likely to continue to perform in an outstanding manner. This grant, which is funded by NIDA, provides stable support for this project for 10 years.

Garret Stuber, PhD, Receives NIH Merit Award - Read More…

Taylor Lab Publishes in Nature Communications

Taylor Lab Publishes in Nature Communications

Anne Marion Taylor’s lab publishes in Nature Communications on the cellular mechanisms of circuit remodeling following axon damage in the mammalian central nervous system.

Taylor Lab Publishes in Nature Communications - Read More…

Faulty cell signaling derails cerebral cortex development, could it lead to autism?

Faulty cell signaling derails cerebral cortex development, could it lead to autism?

Anton Lab Researchers pinpoint signaling problems in the progenitor cells crucial for proper neuron generation and organization.

Faulty cell signaling derails cerebral cortex development, could it lead to autism? - Read More…

UNC named NIH Autism Center of Excellence for third time

UNC named NIH Autism Center of Excellence for third time

As part of a five-year, $7.5 million award, UNC researchers led by Joseph Piven, MD, will follow up on innovative imaging studies to create interventions to help children with autism.

UNC named NIH Autism Center of Excellence for third time - Read More…

NIH grant to help UNC researchers explore microRNA as route to Alzheimer’s therapy

NIH grant to help UNC researchers explore microRNA as route to Alzheimer’s therapy

The National Institute on Aging awarded a $2.6-million, five-year grant to UNC’s Mohanish Deshmukh’s lab to explore miR-29, a key molecule that helps mature brain cells avoid death.

NIH grant to help UNC researchers explore microRNA as route to Alzheimer’s therapy - Read More…

Unraveling Alzheimer’s: New Study Documents How Brain Cells Go Bad

Unraveling Alzheimer’s: New Study Documents How Brain Cells Go Bad

In a first-of-its-kind study, UNC researchers show how a damaging cascade of events inside brain cells – and related to Alzheimer’s disease – can be stopped or reversed.

Unraveling Alzheimer’s: New Study Documents How Brain Cells Go Bad - Read More…

Gupton Lab Featured on Cover of Molecular Biology of the Cell

Gupton Lab Featured on Cover of Molecular Biology of the Cell

The axon guidance cue netrin-1 and its receptor DCC promote axon branching in developing cortical neurons. In this study, we detail a novel molecular mechanism by which the brain-enriched E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 orchestrates multimerization of DCC, requisite activation of FAK and Src family kinases, and increases in exocytic vesicle fusion, all during netrin-dependent neuronal morphogenesis. We are the first to show that non-degradative ubiquitination of a receptor alters kinase activation and signaling pathways during morphogenesis.

Gupton Lab Featured on Cover of Molecular Biology of the Cell - Read More…

Patricia Maness, PhD, Receives NIH R01 Titled, "Mechanisms of Developmental Spine Pruning Regulated by Ig-CAMS and Semaphorins"

Patricia Maness, PhD, Receives NIH R01 Titled, "Mechanisms of Developmental Spine Pruning Regulated by Ig-CAMS and Semaphorins"

The focus of this grant is to illuminate a novel mechanism for dendritic spine pruning in the mammalian neocortex by immunoglobulin (Ig)-class cell adhesion molecules and secreted Semaphorins. The overall goal is to identify mechanisms that govern synaptic connectivity in the mammalian neocortex, and to elucidate how their deficiency contributes to abnormal brain wiring relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders.

Patricia Maness, PhD, Receives NIH R01 Titled, "Mechanisms of Developmental Spine Pruning Regulated by Ig-CAMS and Semaphorins" - Read More…

Celia Shiau, PhD, Awarded 5-Year Outstanding Early-Stage Investigator MIRA Grant

Celia Shiau, PhD, Awarded 5-Year Outstanding Early-Stage Investigator MIRA Grant

The MIRA (Maximizing Investigators' Research Award), awarded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, provides flexibility for investigators to pursue innovative and important research directions as opportunities arise.

Celia Shiau, PhD, Awarded 5-Year Outstanding Early-Stage Investigator MIRA Grant - Read More…

Matthew Judson, PhD, Publishes in the Journal of Neuroscience

Matthew Judson, PhD, Publishes in the Journal of Neuroscience

Microcephaly is a hallmark of Angelman syndrome (AS), a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the HECT domain E3 ubiquitin ligase, UBE3A. However, until recently, the underlying causes of slowed brain growth in individuals with AS had gone unstudied, resulting in significant gaps in understanding of the pathogenesis of the disorder.

Matthew Judson, PhD, Publishes in the Journal of Neuroscience - Read More…

Spencer Smith Awarded UNC's 2017 Philip & Ruth Hettleman Prize for Artistic & Scholarly Achievement

Spencer Smith Awarded UNC's 2017 Philip & Ruth Hettleman Prize for Artistic & Scholarly Achievement

Spencer Smith, PhD, was awarded the highly prestigious 2017 Philip and Ruth Hettleman Prize for Artistic and Scholarly Achievement. Established by Philip Hettleman in 1986, the award recognizes four highly promising faculty members at Carolina. The recipients will be given a $5,000 stipend and will receive recognition at the UNC Faculty Council meeting.

Spencer Smith Awarded UNC's 2017 Philip & Ruth Hettleman Prize for Artistic & Scholarly Achievement - Read More…

Jiami Guo, Anton Lab Postdoctoral Scholar, Publishes in Developmental Cell

Jiami Guo, Anton Lab Postdoctoral Scholar, Publishes in Developmental Cell

An antenna-like structure on cells, once considered a useless vestige, appears to be important for proper brain development in mammals and when impaired can cause defects in the brain’s wiring similar to what’s seen in autism, schizophrenia, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. In lab experiments, UNC School of Medicine scientists prevented these wiring defects by restoring signaling though these antenna-like structures called primary cilia. The study was published on August 7, 2017 in Developmental Cell.

Jiami Guo, Anton Lab Postdoctoral Scholar, Publishes in Developmental Cell - Read More…

Spencer Smith to Lead $10-Million Project to Build Brain-Imaging Technology

Spencer Smith to Lead $10-Million Project to Build Brain-Imaging Technology

The five-year NSF project led by UNC Neuroscience Center research, Spencer Smith, will develop new imaging systems and technology to explore the brain like never before.

Spencer Smith to Lead $10-Million Project to Build Brain-Imaging Technology - Read More…

ALS: New Clues to the Cause and How Future Drugs Might Reverse Disease

ALS: New Clues to the Cause and How Future Drugs Might Reverse Disease

The Cohen Lab and NC State researchers team up to reverse TDP-43 protein aggregation, a hallmark of degenerative diseases.

ALS: New Clues to the Cause and How Future Drugs Might Reverse Disease - Read More…

Hiroyuki Kato Publishes in Neuron

Hiroyuki Kato Publishes in Neuron

In the study published July 6th in the journal Neuron titled, "Network-level Control of Frequency Tuning in Auditory Complex", Kato et al. found a neuronal network basis for how our brain precisely represents the external world.

Hiroyuki Kato Publishes in Neuron - Read More…