Kristine Wadosky

 

Kristine Wadosky

Kristine Wadosky
Bachelor of Arts in English, Bachelor of Science in Molecular Genetics from the University of Rochester


Dissertation Project: Molecular mechanisms by which Muscle RING Finger-1 (MuRF1) regulates cardiac hypertrophy


Kristine graduated from the University of Rochester in 2009 Magna Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English with a concentration in theater and a Bachelor of Science degree in Molecular Genetics. She received the highest honors from University of Rochester’s Department of English and was elected to the Golden Key International Honors Society in 2008 and Phi Beta Kappa in 2009. Kristine entered University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the fall of 2009 through the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program as a doctoral student and joined the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine in the spring of 2010. She is currently performing her doctoral thesis research in the laboratory of Monte S. Willis, M.D., PhD.

Kristine received her first position in a research laboratory as an undergraduate research assistant at the University of Rochester in the fall of 2005 in the laboratory of Virginia Clark, PhD in the Department of Microbiology and Immunoology, where she worked on understanding the growth patterns of gonococcus under anaerobic conditions. In the fall of 2007, she moved to the laboratory of Xin Bi, PhD in the Department of Biology, working as an undergraduate research fellow. There, she investigated the physical interaction between linker histone Hho1p and Orc6p in S. cerevisiae. In the summer of 2008, Kristine received a position as an undergraduate research intern in the Department of Systems Biology in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. There, Kristine worked in the laboratory of Katharina Ribbeck, PhD on elucidating the biomechanical properties of bacterial biofilms.

One at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kristine’s first graduate rotation was carried out in the laboratory of Eleni Tzima, PhD in the Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology. Kristine’s project focused on the role of adapter protein Shc in the vascular endothelial cell response to fluid shear stress. From there, Kristine completed her second research rotation in the laboratory of Frank Church, PhD in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, where she studied the role of heme-oxygenase in vascular endothelial cell permeability. Finally, Kristine had her third research rotation in the laboratory of Monte S. Willis, M.D., PhD in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine where her rotation work, “Regulation of the calpain and ubiquitin-proteasome systems in a canine model of muscular dystrophy” was accepted for publication in the journal of Muscle and Nerve in April 2011. After joining the Willis laboratory in May 2011, Kristine has been working on her doctoral thesis, which is focused on molecular mechanisms by which the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) regulates cardiac hypertrophy both in response to pathologic (systemic hypertension) and physiologic (exercise) stimuli.

Click here for a list of publications, including Kristine's, from the Willis laboratory.

 

 

Current Graduate Students