Education

Courses

 

"Principles and Practices of Alternative and Complementary Medicine" is a popular survey course offered as an elective to students and faculty from the schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Public Health. Each week, students learn about different CAM and integrative therapies from expert practitioners and patients. Well-known modalities such as yoga, acupuncture, and osteopathy are presented, along with more uncommon modalities like energy healing, indigenous practices of the South, and patient perspectives on healing.

 

"Fieldwork in Alternative and Complementary Therapies" (PMED 452) is a 4th year elective for medical students interested in in-depth exploration of complementary, alternative and integrative medicine in an individualized one-month rotation.

 

For more information about this course, fieldwork, electives, internships, or other educational opportunities, contact Program Director, Dr. Susan Gaylord, at gaylords@med.unc.edu.

Faculty Director: Susan Gaylord, PhD (gaylords@med.unc.edu)
Faculty Co-Director: Doug Mann, MD (mannj@neurology.unc.edu)
Course Coordinator: Kelly Eason (kelly_eason@med.unc.edu) 966-8586

 


 

The Immunology of Autoimmune Disease, Inflammation and Chronic Infection:
A Research-Based Functional Medicine Perspective

This 4 week course is taught by Dr. Sam Yanuck, whose functional medicine practice focuses on the care of patients with autoimmune disease and other chronic illnesses.

 

  • Geared towards clinicians and medical students, others by permission.
  • Expand your repertoire of clinical tools to deal more effectively with patients who have complex autoimmune diseases, chronic infections and other chronic illnesses.
  • Highly research oriented. Focused on identifying appropriate physiological targets and choosing appropriate tools with which to address them. Diagnostic and therapeutic topics are discussed in the language of physiology. Power point driven, with virtually slide a quotation or diagram from a peer reviewed study in the medical literature.
  • Focus is “additional tools that are compatible with what you’re already doing” rather than “use this instead of a conventional approach”.
  • Includes functional medicine misconceptions for you and your patients to avoid.

Session 1 - Chronic tissue inflammation & underlying immunological drivers This session teaches you the immunology of tissue inflammation and how to apply functional medicine tools to change tissue chemistry in chronically inflamed patients.


Session 2 - Immunology of vulnerability to infectious disease
This session focuses on 1) inflammation as a promoter of chronic infection, 2) patterns of T cell polarization as predictors of vulnerability, and 3) the immunology of vulnerability to infection in the geriatric population. Includes detailed discussion of functional medicine treatment tools.


Session 3 – Autoimmune Disease Part 1
Using a functional medicine framework, this session teaches you to identify the unique set of factors driving each patient’s autoimmune process, identify appropriate clinical targets, apply best-matched treatment tools, and assess ongoing progress.


Session 4 – Autoimmune Disease Part 2
This session teaches you a functional medicine approach to managing patterns of dysfunction common in patients whose cases are complex or resistant to typical treatment approaches.

 


 

Tai Chi


Complementary & Alternative Medicine Research Fellowship Program

The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, through the Program on Integrative Medicine, the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Neurology, has been awarded an NIH T-32 Fellowship Training Grant for Research in Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine. The award provides support for up to 3 years of research training with potential faculty mentors from multiple UNC departments, divisions and centers.

For more information or to download the application for the T-32 Training Grant, click here.

To request application forms, or if you have any questions, please contact Dr. Doug Mann, Program Director or Dr. Susan Gaylord, Program Co-Director, at or .


For information on the CAM/Integrative Medicine Research Fellowship Program, click here.

Functional Medicine

Fall 2016


The Immunology of Autoimmune Disease, Inflammation and Chronic Infection: A Research-Based Functional Medicine Perspective

WEDNESDAYS: TBD
Location: Conference Room 2, (CG 221-2) in the UNC Cancer Hospital

Instructor: Dr. Sam Yanuk

Click Here to Register

UNC AffiliatesGeneral Public
$180 $225

Faculty and staff, if full-time & permanent, may register through tuition waiver (see your HR person for tuition-waiver form). If you would like to take for non-credit, register on this website. The non-credit cost to attend this course is $180 for UNC faculty and staff; the cost for non-UNC community members is $225(No auditing available)

  • Dr. Yanuk's functional medicine practice focuses on the care of patients with autoimmune disease and other chronic illnesses.
  • Geared towards clinicians and medical students. Emphasizes case examples.
  • Expand your repertoire of clinical tools to deal more effectively with patients who have complex autoimmune diseases, chronic infections and other chronic illnesses. Includes detailed discussion of functional medicine treatment tools to address specific biological targets.
  • Highly research oriented. Focused on identifying appropriate physiological targets and choosing appropriate tools with which to address them. Diagnostic and therapeutic topics are discussed in the language of physiology. PowerPoint driven, with virtually all slides using a quotation or diagram from a peer reviewed study in the medical literature.
  • Focus is "additional tools that are compatible with what you're already doing" rather than "use this instead of a conventional approach."
  • Includes functional medicine misconceptions for you and your patient to avoid.
Session 1 - Chronic Tissue Inflammation & Underlying Immunological Drivers
This session teaches you basics of immunology, the immunology of tissue inflammation and how to apply functional medicine tools to change tissue chemistry in chronically inflamed patients.
Session 2 - Immunology of Vulnerability to Infectious Disease
This session focuses on 1) inflammation as a promoter of chronic infection, 2) patterns of T cell polarization and the patterns of immunological dysfunction and vulnerability that they create, and 3) the immunology of vulnerability to infection in the geriatric population.
Session 3 - Autoimmune Disease Part 1 - Autoimmune Diseases in the Body
Using a functional medicine framework, this session teaches you how to identify the unique set of factors driving each patient's autoimmune process, how to identify appropriate clinical targets, and how to apply best-matched treatment tools.
Session 4 - Autoimmune Disease Part 2 - Brain-Based Autoimmune Diseases
Building on Session 3, this session teaches you about fundamental immunological mechanisms underlying MS, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's, neuromyelitis optica, PANS, and other brain disorders.
Session 5 - Complex Case Management
This session brings together concepts from throughout the course, teaching you to deal with cases that involve multiple immunological problems, including patients with comorbidities like chronic infection, chronic inflammation, or elevated stress levels that complicate autoimmune disease management.

 

Introduction to Complementary, Alternative & Integrative Health Care

MONDAYS: 6:00pm-8:50pm, August 29-December 5, 2016

Instructors: Susan Gaylord, PHD. & Various UNC faculty and CAM practitioners

Location: The course will be held in Main Conference Room, rm 1, (CG 222) in the UNC Cancer Hospital.

If you would like to take this course for non credit register on the blue box below:


$250 for UNC Affiliates, $300 for general public, (no auditing available)


For questions contact: Kelly Eason () (919) 966-8586

Faculty Director: Susan Gaylord, PhD (gaylords@med.unc.edu)
Faculty Co-Director: Doug Mann, MD (mannj@neurology.unc.edu)
Course Coordinator: Pamela Phillips (pamela_phillips@med.unc.edu) 966-8586

Purpose of Course: This course is designed to introduce medical students, other health professions students, faculty, health practitioners, and researchers to the philosophies, practitioners, techniques, and evidence of efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapeutics currently in use in the United States, including chiropractic, dietary, mind-body medicine, acupuncture, homeopathy, healing touch and energy therapies, prayer, and herbal therapies.
A large and growing percentage of Americans use one or more of a wide range of complementary, alternative or unconventional healing therapies, often in addition to seeking advice from physicians. Increasingly, research is showing efficacy for many of these therapies. Ability to understand and communicate effectively with patients and other care providers about these therapies should enhance patients’ health and safety and optimize health care.

Course Objectives: As a result of the course, learners should be able to:

  • Describe the use of CAM therapies in the United States;
  • Describe healing paradigms and rationales for patients' use of these therapies;
  • Describe the philosophies, theoretical basis and techniques of various CAM therapies;
  • Discuss the training and certification of practitioners of these therapies;
  • Discuss uses of each therapy and evidence of efficacy; and
  • Describe the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to communicate effectively with practitioners and users of CAM and conventional therapies.

Format: The course provides an introduction to the field of CAM and integrative health-care, including a wide range of alternative modalities, in lecture-and-discussion format, presented by an active practitioner of the therapy and/or a person knowledgeable in the field, with patient presentations, demonstrations and audience participation where applicable. Presentations cover diagnostic methods, treatment, evidence of efficacy and safety for various conditions, training of practitioners, the practitioner-patient relationship, patient satisfaction, role of prevention, and potential for interactions with conventional healthcare. Topical readings supplement lectures and demonstrations.

The complete course, including additional assignments and tests, is listed as PMED 250, HBHE 960, and NURS 703

  • Expand your repertoire of clinical tools to deal more effectively with patients who have complex autoimmune diseases, chronic infections and other chronic illnesses.
  • Highly research oriented. Focused on identifying appropriate physiological targets and choosing appropriate tools with which to address them. Diagnostic and therapeutic topics are discussed in the language of physiology. Powerpoint driven, with virtually slide a quotation or diagram from a peer reviewed study in the medical literature.
  • Focus is “additional tools that are compatible with what you’re already doing” rather than “use this instead of a conventional approach”.
  • Includes functional medicine misconceptions for you and your patients to avoid.

Session 1 - Chronic tissue inflammation & underlying immunological drivers               This session teaches you the immunology of tissue inflammation and how to apply functional medicine tools to change tissue chemistry in chronically inflamed patients.


Session 2 - Immunology of vulnerability to infectious disease
This session focuses on 1) inflammation as a promoter of chronic infection, 2) patterns of T cell polarization as predictors of vulnerability, and 3) the immunology of vulnerability to infection in the geriatric population. Includes detailed discussion of functional medicine treatment tools.


Session 3 – Autoimmune Disease Part 1
Using a functional medicine framework, this session teaches you to identify the unique set of factors driving each patient’s autoimmune process, identify appropriate clinical targets, apply best-matched treatment tools, and assess ongoing progress.


Session 4 – Autoimmune Disease Part 2
This session teaches you a functional medicine approach to managing patterns of dysfunction common in patients whose cases are complex or resistant to typical treatment approaches.

Faculty and staff, if full-time & permanent, may register through tuition waiver (see your HR person for tuition-waiver form).
If you would like to take if for non-credit, register on this website. The non-credit cost to attend this course is $200 for UNC faculty and staff; the cost for non-UNC community members is $300(No auditing available)

Fieldwork in Alternative and Complementary Therapies

"Fieldwork in Alternative and Complementary Therapies" (PMED 452) is an individualized 4th year elective for medical students interested in in-depth exploration of complementary, alternative and integrative medicine in a one-month rotation. Students may choose to delve in depth into a particular CAM experience, or choose to make shorter visits to a variety or a specific subset of CAM field experiences. Students will be asked to devote at least 20% of their time to review of the evidence-based literature, as well as to keep a journal and develop a presentation on a particular topic of interest to the medical community.

Research Fellowship in Complementary & Alternative Medicine

The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, through the Program on Integrative Medicine, the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Neurology, has been awarded an NIH T-32 Fellowship Training Grant for Research in Complementary, Alternative and Integrative Medicine. The award provides support for up to 3 years of research training with potential faculty mentors from multiple UNC departments, divisions and centers.

The overall goal of this program is to recruit talented postdoctoral health professionals and allied scientists for training in research designed to examine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, mechanisms of action and cost-benefits of complementary and alternative medical therapies (CAM), and integrative medicine. Through our three-year training program, fellows will be rigorously trained in research methodology, receive a firm grounding in CAM concepts and research issues, participate in the ongoing research of their mentors, develop and conduct studies that will create the foundation for future trials, and participate in the development of innovative tools and measurements for CAM and integrative approaches to care. We expect the program to produce highly qualified, successful investigators whose careers will contribute substantially to research in CAM.

Trainees will be hired for a three-year interdisciplinary program designed for physicians, as well as doctoral-level behavioral and social scientists, and doctoral level credentialed CAM practitioners. The program consists of seminars and formal course work, individual mentoring, research projects, elective seminars and classes, teaching, and a number of optional activities.

Eligibility

Integrative Medicine Post-doctoral Research Fellowships are open to individuals with doctoral degrees (e.g., MD, PhD, DO). In order to qualify for this federally funded grant, an applicant must be a U.S. citizen, a non-citizen national or a foreign national possessing a visa permitting permanent U.S. residence. Having a temporary or student visa is not acceptable under this grant. We plan on hiring two trainees in the first year, and two additional trainees in each of the second and third years. The University of North Carolina is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Application Process

Application materials include:

  • Completed Application Form (see link above)
  • Curriculum Vita
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Signed "Explanation of NIH Requirements" (upon request)

To request application forms, or if you have any questions, please contact Pamela Phillips at 919-966-8586 or by email at pamelap@med.unc.edu.

Program Description

The UNC Research Fellowship Program in Integrative Medicine will provide the following opportunities:

  • A multidisciplinary research and clinical environment that brings together physicians, CAM practitioners, and basic, behavioral, social, and health-services researchers in a premier academic health professions environment
  • Formal coursework in epidemiology, statistics, and other quantitative as well as qualitative research methods, with an option for a Masters in Public Health degree
  • Application of research methodology through hands-on involvement in one or more CAM research projects with faculty mentoring
  • Formal coursework and seminars in a wide variety of CAM philosophies, proposed mechanisms of action and techniques used in health care
  • Clinical experience in integrative approaches to care
  • Interaction with other scholars/fellows to reinforce and deepen understanding of the research process through "works-in-progress" seminars that integrate and support experiences and knowledge
  • Mentoring in grant writing and other academic faculty skills needed to attract funding for research
  • Opportunities for teaching and presenting research

Meet the Fellows


Rebecca Campo, Ph.D, completed her doctoral degree in Social-Health Psychology at the University of Utah and was a Research Associate in the Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program at Huntsman Cancer Institute until 2013. Her doctoral research was funded by a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (F31) and focused on the emotional and cardiovascular benefits of supportive quality relationships (i.e., friends, pets) during and while recovering from stress. Her overall research interests include examination and understanding of the role that supportive relationships and mind-body interventions have in promoting resilience in cancer survivors and other chronically distressed populations. Dr. Campo is also interested in examining the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) among cancer survivors, and the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions for adolescent young adult cancer survivors. Her most recent research included the efficacy of Tai Chi Chih and Qigong randomized controlled trials for improving health-related quality of life, psychosocial, and physiological outcomes in older cancer survivors. She is currently implementing (with Dr. Karen Bluth) a school-based mindfulness intervention for students enrolled in an alternative high school



Jaime Hughes, MPH, MSW,
 is a doctoral student in the School of Social Work and Department of Health Behavior in the Gillings School of Global Public Health. Her research focuses on military Veterans and the intersection of sleep disturbance, trauma, and chronic pain on functional outcomes and successful aging. Jaime's research involves the investigation of hybrid interventions combining mindfulness and cognitive behavioral therapy on enhancing longterm physiological and psychological resilience in individuals with chronic sleep disturbance. Prior to her doctoral training, Jaime was a research associate with the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center of the Greater Los Angeles VA Healthcare System where she worked on a variety of survey and intervention research studies focused on behavioral sleep programs for both older Veterans and women Veterans. Jaime received her MPH and MSW degrees from the University of Michigan in 2009 and her BA from New York University in 2003.



Kristin Jerger, M.D,
 is a physician and a licensed massage therapist in North Carolina.  She received her medical and neuroscience research training at the Medical University of South Carolina (M.D.), George Washington University Medical Center (residency in Psychiatry), Children's National Medical Center, and George Mason University's Krasnow Institute of Advanced Study in Fairfax, Virginia where her research focused on neural dynamics of pediatric epilepsy. Dr. Jerger served as Director of Health Policy for the Council of Latino Agencies in Washington, D.C. from 2004-2007, when she moved with her husband and toddler twins to Costa Rica for a year.  After her children entered kindergarten, she attended Body Therapy Institute, in Siler City, NC, and became a licensed massage therapist in 2011. Currently, she is Postdoctoral Research Fellow in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Program in Integrative Medicine within the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.  In this position, she is drawing on her medical, psychiatric, neuroscience research, and massage backgrounds to build an integrated research and clinical practice that focuses on using touch to help alleviate suffering and strengthen connections.



Hongtao Li, M.B.B.S., Ph.D,
 has research interests that fall mainly in the field of integrative medicine, with a current focus on biomarkers during the process of diet, exercise and other healthy or pathogenic conditions. She is also interested in testing the traditional Chinese medicine theories with the most recent state-of-art technology. Hongtao holds an M.B.B.S. from Tongji Medical University, Wuhan, China in 1990. She finished her residency in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the First Hospital of Wuhan. She received her Ph.D. in 2009 in the department of Biology, Indiana State University with an emphasis on Immunology. She is a certified instructor in Tai Chi for Arthritis and Tai Chi for Diabetes from Tai Chi for Health Institute and American Arthritis Foundation.


Aaron Piepemier, Ph.D, completed his doctoral degree in Kinesiology - Sport & Exercise Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 2015. His work examined potential biological mechanisms of the physical activity-cognitive performance relationship (i.e., Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, BDNF). In addition to his academic accomplishments, he holds a 4th degree black belt and has 20 years of experience practicing and instructing martial arts. The Program on Integrative Medicine provides the necessary support for him to combine his two passions of martial arts and health science into the development of a line of research examining the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on outcomes related to the health and function of the human brain. 


Erin Walsh Ph.D, acquired her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kentucky under mentorship of Ruth Baer, Ph.D., where she received strong research and clinical training in mindfulness and mindfulness-based interventions. This training was supplemented by a two-year postdoctoral research position at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the stress physiology of depression under mentorship of Heather Abercrombie, Ph.D. Erin joined the UNC T32 Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Integrative Medicine to build expertise in functional magnetic resonance imaging and neurobiology of depression under mentorship of Gabriel Dichter, Ph.D. Erin’s long-term career objective is to explore the mechanisms by which mindfulness-based interventions alter stress-related neural, immune, and endocrine processes in persons with unipolar depression, and how such changes influence depressive cognition, emotion, and behavior. Erin’s current program of research investigates how mindfulness may reduce risk for depression in individuals with early life adversity by targeting key stress-related neural and immune circuits.


Nick Wise, Ph.D, is a chiropractic physician whose research interests include studying the effects of transcranial laser therapy on musculoskeletal pain conditions and athletic performance. His current project is examining the effects of Cranial Laser Reflex Technique on hamstring strength and flexibility in active college students.