Flavio Frohlich, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Cell Biology & Physiology, and Biomedical Engineering

 

 Frohlich, Flavio 2013

Email: flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu

Office: 4109F Neuroscience Research Building

Phone: (919) 966-4584

Website: http://www.frohlichlab.org

 

Education:

International Diploma, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
Diplom-Ingenieur
, Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland
PhD., Computational Neurobiology, University of California, San Diego & The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Postdoctoral Fellowship, Neurobiology, Yale University


Research Interests:

The laboratory of Dr. Frohlich studies cortical state dynamics and develops non-invasive brain stimulation approaches to treat neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia, autism, and depression that are caused by pathological network dynamics. Dr. Frohlich employs a multidisciplinary approach that combines large-scale computer simulations of cortical networks, in vitro multi electrode and patch-clamp electrophysiology, parallel extracellular electrophysiology in awake and anesthetized ferrets, and electroencephalography combined with transcranial current stimulation in humans. The integration of these methods allow for the discovery of the fundamental guiding principles of cortical network dynamics and the development of targeted, individualized brain-stimulation based on control engineering for the treatment of psychiatric patient populations for which there exists little help from currently approved medications. Recent discoveries in the lab include (1) the mechanism of action of transcranial Alternating Current stimulation (tACs), (2) a novel brain stimulation paradigm in humans to enhance the endogenous antagonism of slow and fast brain rhythms, (3) the differential role of cholinergic and adrenergic signaling defining cortical activity states, and (4) the role of anesthesia on cortical state dynamics and sensory processing.

 

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