Sheryl S. Moy, Ph.D.

Professor

 

Moy, Sheryl

 

Email: ssmoy@med.unc.edu

Phone: (919) 966-3082





Education:

A.B., Sociology/Psychology, Duke University
M.A., Psychology, East Carolina University
Ph.D., Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Research Interests:

Dr. Moy's research addresses genetic factors in susceptibility to neurodevelopmental disorders, and preclinical efficacy testing with novel therapeutic agents, using mouse models for psychiatric and neurological conditions. Current studies in the Moy laboratory utilize knockout or transgenic mouse lines with disruptions of NMDA, serotonin, or other signaling pathways as models of human clinical disorders. With Drs. Gary Duncan and Beverly Koller, she is using mice with reduced NMDA receptor levels as a model of the intrinsic glutamatergic hypofunction associated with schizophrenia. This collaborative group has already determined behavioral and pharmacological profiles in the model, and demonstrated alterations in neural circuitry underlying abnormal social behavior and deficient sensorimotor gating. The aims for Dr. Moy’s present project include characterization of the time course for emergence of schizophrenia-like phenotypes and the evaluation of early intervention with typical and atypical antipsychotic compounds. A second line of research in her laboratory focuses on the C58/J inbred strain as a model for aberrant repetitive behavior and social deficits, relevant to symptoms in autism. In this project, she is examining developmental onset of stereotypy and other behavioral abnormalities, treatment efficacy of both acute and chronic drug regimens against overt repetitive responses, and possible neuroanatomical correlates of repetitive behavior in the C58/J model, using brain imaging approaches. In addition, Dr. Moy is working with Drs. Cort Pedersen and Mike Jarstfer on a project utilizing these mouse models and others as screens for therapeutic effects of novel oxytocin receptor activators against schizophrenia-like or autism-like phenotypes.


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