Radiation Oncology Residency

The Program's objectives, facilities, faculty, prerequisites and application process.

Radiation Oncology Residency Training Program

Introduction

The Radiation Oncology Residency Training Program at the 800-bed University of North Carolina Hospitals meets all the requirements of the American Board of Radiology (ABR) and is fully accredited by the American Medical Association's Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME; see also UNC Healthcare's GME site). UNC Hospitals are the teaching hospitals of the UNC School of Medicine, located on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The first hospital in what later became known as UNC Hospitals and the UNC Health Care System was North Carolina Memorial Hospital, which opened on Sept. 2, 1952. 

The North Carolina Cancer Hospital, first opened in 2009,  is the state's major referral center for patients with cancer and has active oncology subspecialty programs in Radiation Oncology, Medical Oncology, Gynecologic Oncology, Urologic Oncology, Surgical and Breast Oncology, Thoracic Oncology, Head and Neck Cancer, Pediatric Oncology, and Neuro-Oncology. The Cancer Hospital is the clinical face of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 36 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers in the United States, and nationally recognized for excellence in cutting-edge basic, clinical and translational cancer research. 

Program Objectives

The Radiation Oncology Residency Training Program at UNC encompasses training in the fundamental principles of oncology, comprehensive cancer management, clinical radiation oncology, radiation treatment techniques, patient safety and healthcare engineering, and a research experience. The program offers “in house” didactic teaching of radiation therapy physics, dosimetry, treatment planning, biostatistics, radiation and cancer biology, and radiation pathology by nationally-recognized expert educators. Intra-professional education is also emphasized, with residents interacting regularly with their fellow trainees in medical physics, radiation therapy and medical dosimetry.  Teaching is closely integrated with a multidisciplinary approach to state-of-the-art clinical management of cancer patients and investigative clinical research protocols. 

The four-year residency program consists of a minimum of 36 months in clinical radiation oncology, electives (or equivalent) in medical oncology, surgical oncology, surgical pathology, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, and radiation physics and dosimetry. In addition, a six month research elective supervised by a faculty preceptor is offered in areas as diverse as treatment planning, molecular radiation and cancer biology, cancer nanotechnology and immunotherapy, healthcare engineering, health services research or other specialized areas of clinical radiation oncology (e.g., IMRT/IGRT, stereotactic radiosurgery, intraoperative radiotherapy, etc.). Interested residents can also use their research time to earn a Master of Public Health degree from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, the leading public school of public health in the United States. Departmental faculty also have strong ties to the related disciplines of computer science, biomedical engineering, diagnostic imaging, genetics, nanotechnology, pathology and pharmacology, facilitating additional research opportunities for residents.

The Department has an ACGME-approved complement of eight residents, with two new residents accepted into the program each July.

Clinical training is provided in the standard care of common cancers as well as instruction in the management of unusual and complex oncologic problems. Over 2,500 patients are referred annually to the Department of Radiation Oncology. These include large numbers of patients with breast, gynecological, head and neck, bronchopulmonary, and lymphoreticular malignancies, along with patients with a wide range of other type of cancers. Non-oncologic conditions such as arteriovenous malformations are seen for stereotactic radiosurgery.

As residents advance through their training, they assume increasing responsibility for the evaluation and management of patient referrals, external beam and brachytherapy procedures, care of patients under treatment and follow-up care. 

Facilities

The NC Cancer Hospital houses Radiation Oncology's clinical, physics and computing, healthcare engineering, educational and administrative programs. (The Cancer Biology Division is housed nearby in the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.)  The move to the Cancer Hospital consolidated all clinical oncology services and professional staff in a single location, and helped streamline operational efficiency. The move also facilitates unique education and training opportunities for our residents in the form of closer, more flexible interactions with faculty and peers in the other oncology specialties.

The 36,000 square foot Department of Radiation Oncology treats over 2,000 patients per year, and is an integral part of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. The Department has active research programs in clinical oncology, cancer biology, healthcare engineering and medical physics. The Department is an acknowledged world leader in the areas of computer-aided radiotherapy treatment planning and quality assurance/human factors research aimed at continuously improving patient safety.

In addition to our main facility in Chapel Hill, we have affiliate clinics in High Point and Lenoir, NC, as well as at Rex-UNC Healthcare, Raleigh, NC, a fully-owned component of UNC Radiation Oncology.  Our alliance with Rex Hospital further extends our reach with additional clinics in Wakefield, Clayton and Smithfield, NC.

The Department features the following treatment equipment and capabilities: three linear accelerators with MLC and independent jaws; a Calypso® IGRT system; a CT scanner on rails; a dedicated CT scanner for conformal treatment planning; a CyberKnife® stereotactic radiosurgery system; a TomoTherapy® system; a simulator; high and low dose rate brachytherapy equipment; and 3-D treatment planning workstations. These machines permit high energy X-ray, electron beam, and specialized radiation treatments.

A self-shielded, J.L. Shepherd Mark I irradiator is also available for radiation biology research, and serves as a campus-wide core facility for such.

Residents participate in an active brachytherapy program involving over 150 high and low dose rate radiation implant procedures annually for the treatment of gynecological, genitourinary, head and neck, esophagus, lung and other malignancies. A full array of radioactive sources for interstitial and intracavitary radiation therapy is available including iridium-192, iodine-125 and phosphorus-32.

Other specialized treatment programs include intraoperative radiation therapy and total body irradiation for bone marrow transplantation.

Advanced treatment planning systems on computer work stations are used for all types of external beam, interstitial and intracavitary treatment plans that are routinely used in the clinical management of patients. The Department is at the forefront of research and development of sophisticated 3-D imaging and treatment planning for clinical applications, and residents routinely carry out advanced 3-D conformal treatment planning.

Radiation Oncology residents have their own work area equipped with personal computers which are part of the Department's extensive local area network. This network provides ready access to Medline, the Health Sciences Library, UNC Hospitals laboratories and the Tumor Registry, and to the internet.

Conferences

Didactic teaching courses with lectures once or twice a week are held in radiation physics and dosimetry (annually), and radiation and cancer biology (biennially). Residents participate in teaching, patient care and research in the Department, as well as attend both in-house and multidisciplinary conferences of the UNC Clinical Cancer Program. The in-house conferences include:

  1. daily morning conferences where residents make case presentations, discuss clinical treatment planning, and review simulations
  2. weekly chart rounds where current patients receiving radiotherapy are presented
  3. weekly radiation oncology clinical seminars
  4. monthly journal clubs with both resident and faculty participation
  5. monthly morbidity and mortality conferences
  6. monthly faculty research conferences
  7. less frequent conferences:  Visiting Professor lectures; oncology grand rounds; mock oral boards sessions; In-Training exam review; "best of" medical or scientific conference reports

Regular multidisciplinary conferences are held in conjunction with the Breast Oncology, Gynecologic Oncology, Medical Oncology, Surgical Oncology, Head and Neck Surgery, Pediatric Oncology, Neuro-Oncology and Gastrointestinal Oncology programs. Residents also have an opportunity to attend a variety of oncology-related lectures and symposia elsewhere on the UNC campus.

Research Programs

The Department of Radiation Oncology is actively engaged in clinical investigation programs through national cooperative research groups including the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), Cancer and Acute Leukemia Group B (CALGB), National Surgical Adjuvant Breast Program (NSABP), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), and the Children's Cancer Study Group (CCSG).  Intramurally, faculty members are actively engaged in studies of normal tissue toxicity, radiation-drug interactions, and combination therapy with surgery and radiation.  Other areas of clinical interest include heath care outcomes research, and human factors/operations research and LEAN management principles with the ultimate goal of improving patient safety (our Department is a national leader in this area).

The Division of Cancer Biology has as its emphasis the study of molecular mechanisms of radiation action, new drug discovery and characterization, and basic cancer biology.

The Division of Physics and Computing develops and implements state-of-the-art imaging tools that allow radiation oncologists to better understand the various dose delivery systems and to aid in the development of newer techniques of dose delivery. The Division also has an active cancer nanotechnology program.

The Division of Healthcare Engineering has a broad focus, studying the impact of transformational leadership, Lean-based management practices, design of physical spaces and processes, and cognitive/behavioral factors on workers’ ability to perform their jobs well, with the ultimate goal of improving efficiency, reliability, safety and quality of radiation therapy treatment.

An additional factor that has major implications for the institutional cancer programs is the University Cancer Research Fund (UCRF). This fund, developed by the state legislature, commits an initial $25M per year, increasing to $50M per year, in support of cancer research efforts at UNC, including the development of clinical excellence in delivery of care to cancer patients and substantial research infrastructure support. A second resource is the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences (NC TraCS) Institute based at UNC, part of a national consortium of medical research institutions that together offer programs and services supporting researchers through all phases of the "bench to bedside" process of translational research. Our Department benefits from both of these programs in terms of our clinical and basic research efforts that, in turn, offer additional training opportunities for our residents.

Faculty

The Departmental faculty include nineteen ABR-certified radiation oncologists (including those at our affiliates), ten ABR-certified medical physicists, four radiation/cancer biologists, two faculty members devoted largely to education, two faculty members involved in LEAN management and human factors research, and joint faculty from the Department of Computer Science. Most are actively involved in the clinical care of oncology patients, teaching and/or research. In addition to mentoring radiation oncology and medical physics residents, faculty members are also involved in education and training programs for medical students, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, radiation therapists and medical dosimetrists. They have ongoing research programs, hold leadership roles in national clinical protocol development, and make regular contributions to scientific conferences at the local, regional, national and international levels.

Program Prerequisites

In order to be eligible for our radiation oncology residency training program, an applicant must:

  • Be a US citizen or hold a valid US immigration VISA that permits employment in the United States. The UNC Department of Radiation Oncology does not provide sponsorship for any type of immigration VISA.
  • Successfully complete all United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) requirements or, if a foreign medical graduate, all Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) requirements.
  • Successfully complete a one year clinical internship in a hospital approved by the ACGME prior to entering the residency training program.

Application Process

Each year, two new residents meeting all program prerequisites are accepted. Anywhere from 30-40 applicants are selected for personal interviews. Interviews are conducted in groups of 8-10 applicants during the months of November, December and January. Having completed a prior rotation during medical school at the UNC Department of Radiation Oncology does not automatically guarantee an interview for a residency position.

Positions are offered through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), and applications must be submitted using the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) system.

For the Fall, 2017 interview season, we will have two open residency positions (start date: July 1, 2019).

Additional Information

You may obtain additional information by contacting the Program Coordinator:

Ms. Rebecca Moore

Phone: (984) 974-8418

 

 

 

Radiation Oncology Residents

 2017-2018 Radiation Oncology Residents

*For the Fall, 2017 interview season, we will have two open residency positions (start date: July 1, 2019). 

 

Recent Alumni

Dr. Joseph Caster
Assistant Professor
Department of Radiation Oncology
University of Iowa School of Medicine
Iowa City, IA

Dr. Jordan Holmes
Assistant Professor
Department of Radiation Oncology
University of Indiana School of Medicine
Indianapolis, IN

Dr. Aaron Falchook
Radiology Associates of Hollywood
Hollywood, FL

Dr. Michael Eblan
Department of Radiation Oncology
Inova Fairfax Hospital and Inova Schar Cancer Institute
Fairfax, VA  

Dr. Seth Miller
Carolina East Radiation Oncology
New Bern, NC

Dr. Gregg Goldin
Lynne Cancer Institute
Boca Raton, FL 

Dr. Noam VanderWalde
Assistant Professor
University of Tennessee/The West Clinic Radiation Oncology Group
Memphis, TN

Dr. Nathan Sheets
Assistant Professor
Rex-UNC Radiation Oncology
Raleigh, NC

    Aaron Falchook (2012)

    Dr. Aaron Falchook
    Aaron Falchook (2012)
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    Michael Eblan (2012)

    Michael Eblan, M.D.
    Michael Eblan (2012)
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    Joe Caster (2013)

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    Dr. Gregory Judy (PGY 5)

    Education

    • Undergraduate:  Miami University, Oxford OH
    • Graduate School: The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
    • Medical School: The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences,Toledo, OH
    • Internship:  Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC

     

    Honors and Awards

    Medical School:

      • Academic Excellence Scholarship, 2009 – 2010
      • Academic Enrichment Center Certificate of Appreciation, 2009  2011
      • Ralph Riddall Dobelbower Award for Achievement in Radiation Oncology, 2013 

     

    Publications
    (as of 9/12/17)

    • Judy GD, Mosaly PR, Mazur LM, Tracton G, Marks LB, Chera BS. Identifying factors and root causes associated with near-miss or safety incidents in patients treated with radiotherapy: A case-control analysis. J Oncol Pract 2017 Aug;13(8):e683-e693. [ePub] PMID: 28650743.


    Meeting Abstracts/Presentations

    • Elnahal SM, Mazur L, Blackford A, Judy G, Conley II WK, Tracton G, McNutt TR, Chera BS. A validated nomogram to predict near miss and safety incidents in radiation oncology: A multi-institutional effort. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, October 18-21, 2015.  (Poster presentation.)

    • Judy G. Stress test intensity and ECG correlation with nuclear imaging. Joint 57th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine and 1st World Congress on Exercise is Medicine®, Baltimore, MD, June 1-5, 2010. (Poster presentation.)

    Dr. Kyle Wang (PGY 5)

    Education

    • Undergraduate: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
    • Medical School: University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
    • Internship: University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 


    Honors and Awards

    Undergraduate:

      • Phi Beta Kappa, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2008

    Medical School:

      • Dean’s Merit Scholarship, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 2009
      • William S. McEllroy Award for Excellence in the Basic Medical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 2010
      • Howard Wong Abstract Resident/Student Travel Award, American College of Radiation Oncology, 2011
      • Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, 2013 (elected in junior year)


    Research Interests

    Head and neck cancer, stereotactic body radiotherapy


    Publications
    (as of 9/12/17)

    • Moon DH, Moon SH, Wang K, Weissler MC, et al. Incidence of, and risk factors for, mandibular osteoradionecrosis in patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancers. Oral Oncol 2017 Sep;72:98-103. PMID: 28797468.
    • Wang K, Eblan MJ, Deal AM, Lipner M, Zagar TM, et al. Cardiac toxicity after radiotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: Pooled analysis of dose-escalation trials delivering 70 to 90 Gy. J Clin Oncol 2017 May 1;35(13):1387-1394. PMID: 28113017.
    • Wang K, Zanation AM, Chera BS. The role of radiation therapy in the management of sinonasal and ventral skull base malignancies. Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2017 Apr;50(2):419-432. PMID: 28104274.
    • Verma V, Shostrom VK, Zhen W, Zhang M, Braunstein SE, Holland J, Hallemeier CL, Harkenrider MM, Iskhanian A, Jabbour SK, Attia A, Lee P, Wang K, et alInfluence of fractionation scheme and tumor location on toxicities after stereotactic body radiation therapy for large (≥5 cm) non-small cell lung cancer: A multi-institutional analysis. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2017 Mar 15;97(4):778-785. PMID: 28244414.
    • Verma V, Shostrom VK, Kumar SS, Zhen W, Hallemeier CL, Braunstein SE, Holland J, Harkenrider MM, Iskhanian A, Neboori HJ, Jabbour SK, Attia A, Lee P, AliteF, Walker JM, Stahl JM, Wang Ket al.  Multi-institutional experience of stereotactic body radiotherapy for large (≥5 centimeters) non-small cell lung tumors. Cancer 2017 Feb 15;123(4):688-696. PMID: 27741355.
    • Chera B, Wang K, Monroe A, Galloway T, et al. Truth or myth: Definitive chemoradiotherapy doesn’t work for HPV/p16 negative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma?  Oral Oncol 2017 Feb;65:125-126. PMID: 27993466.
    • Wang K, Mullins BT, Falchook AD, Lian J, He K, et al. Evaluation of PET/MRI for tumor volume delineation for head and neck cancer. Front Oncol 2017 Jan 23;7:8. PMID: 28168166.
    • Wang K, Sheets NC, Basak R, Chen RC. Ascertainment of postprostatectomy radiotherapy for prostate cancer in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Cancer 2016 Oct;122(19):3069-3074. PMID: 27352280.
    • Wang K, Amdur RJ, Mendenhall WM, Green R, et al. Impact of post-chemoradiotherapy superselective/selective neck dissection on patient reported quality of life. Oral Oncol 2016 Jul;58:21-26. PMID: 27311398.
    • Shtessel L, Lowden MR, Simon M, Wang K, et al. C. elegans POT-1 and POT-2 repress telomere maintenance pathways. G3 (Bethesda). 2013 Feb;3(2):305-313. PMID: 23390606.
    • Wang KHeron DEClump DAFlickinger JCet alTarget delineation in stereotactic body radiation therapy for recurrent head and neck cancer: a retrospective analysis of the impact of margins and automated PET-CT segmentation. Radiother Oncol 2013 Jan;106(1):90-95. PMID: 23333021.
    • Wang K, Heron DE, Flickinger JC, Rwigema JC, et al. A retrospective, deformable registration analysis of the impact of PET-CT planning on patterns of failure in stereotactic body radiation therapy for recurrent head and neck cancer. Head Neck Oncol 2012 Apr 19;4:12. PMID: 22515371.


    Meeting Abstracts/Presentations (recent)

    • Lindsay DP, Caster JM, Wang K, Myung JH, et al. Nanotechnology-based quantification of circulating tumor cells in oligometastatic patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Wang K, Wong T, Amdur RJ, Mendenhall WM, et al. Pitfalls of PET surveillance in patients with HPV-associated oropharynx cancer treated on a multi-institutional de-intensification trial.  American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Wang K, Pearlstein KA, Mahbooba Z, Sutton S, et al. Xerostomia is an unrecognized complication of whole brain radiotherapy and may be related to parotid dose: A prospective observational trial.  American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Lindsay DP, Caster JM, Wang K, Myung JH, Chen RC, Chera BS, Gupta GP, Jones E, Tepper JE, Varia MA, Zagar T, Hong S, Wang A. Prospective characterization of circulating tumor cells using a nanotechnology-based capture system in oligometastatic patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy.  American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, June 2-6, 2017. (Poster presentation.)
    • Eblan MJ, Myung JH, Caster JM, Wang K, Green R, et al. Use of nanotechnology-based system for the prospective characterization of circulating tumor cells in oligometastatic cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Oral presentation.)
    • Caster JM, Eblan MJ, Myung JH, Wang K, et al. Use of a nanotechnology-based system for the prospective characterization of circulating tumor cells in head and neck cancer patients. American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, June 3-7, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Wang K. Cardiac toxicity after radiation for Stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Pooled analysis of several prospective dose-escalation trials delivering 70-90 Gy. Presented at The Third Annual George F. Shelton Resident Research Symposium, Chapel Hill, NC, May 18, 2016. (Oral presentation.) 
    • Wang K, Mullins B, Falchook A, Lian J, et al.  Comparison of tumor volume delineation on magnetic resonance/positron emission tomography versus standard computed tomography: Is there added value? Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium, Scottsdale, AZ, February 18-20, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Wang K, Amdur RJ, Mendenhall WM, Green R, et al.  Impact of post-chemoradiation therapy selective neck dissection on patient-reported quality of life. Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium, Scottsdale, AZ, February 18-20, 2016. (Poster presentation.)

    Jordan Holmes (2014)

    Dr. Jordan Holmes
    Jordan Holmes (2014)
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    Gregory Judy (2014)

    Gregory Judy (2014)
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    Kyle Wang (2014)

    Dr. Kyle Wang
    Kyle Wang (2014)
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    Dominic Moon (2015)

    Dominic Moon (2015)
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    Dr. Kevin Pearlstein

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    Daniel Lindsay (2016)

    Dr. Daniel Lindsay
    Daniel Lindsay (2016)
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    Brandon Mulllins (2016)

    Dr. Brandon Mullins
    Brandon Mulllins (2016)
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    Dr. Dominic Moon (PGY 4)

    Education

    • Undergraduate: University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
    • Medical School: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
    • Internship: Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, CA 
       

    Honors and Awards

    Undergraduate:

      • Echols Scholar (granted to the top 8% of students at the University of Virginia College of Arts and Sciences), 2008

    Medical School:

      • J. Griswold and Margery H. Ruth Scholarship, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 2009-2014
      • Student Biomedical Research Program Fellow, University of Michigan School of Medicine, 2010
      • National Institutes of Health Medical Research Scholars Program Fellow (National Cancer Institute), 2012-2013


    Research Interests

    Head and neck cancer, prostate cancer 


    Publications
    (as of 9/12/17)

    • Ye F, Moon DH, Carpenter WR, Reeve BB, Usinger DS, Green RL, Spearman K, Sheets NC, Pearlstein KA, Lucero AR, Waddle MR, Godley PA, Chen RC.  Comparison of patient report and medical records of comorbidities: results from a population-based cohort of patients with prostate cancer. JAMA Oncol 2017 Aug 1;3(8):1035-1042. PMID: 28208186.
    • Moon DH, Efstathiou JA, Chen RC. What is the best way to radiate the prostate in 2016? Urol Oncol 2017 Feb;35(2):59-68. PMID: 27395453.
    • Vainshtein JM, Moon DH, Feng FY, Chepeha DB, et al. Long-term quality of life after swallowing and salivary-sparing chemo-intensity modulated radiation therapy in survivors of human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2015 Apr 1;91(5):925-933. PMID: 25832685.
    • Lau D, Moon DH, Park P, Hervey-Jumper S, et al. Radiation-induced intradural malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the cauda equina with diffuse leptomeningeal metastasis. J Neurosurg Spine 2014 Nov;21(5):719-726. PMID: 25216401.
    • Feng FY, Speers C, Liu M, Jackson WC, Moon D, et al. Targeted radiosensitization with PARP1 inhibition: Optimization of therapy and identification of biomarkers of response in breast cancer.  Breast Cancer Res Treat 2014 Aug;147(1):81-94. PMID: 25104443.
    • O'Sullivan CC, Moon DH, Kohn EC, Lee JM. Beyond breast and ovarian cancers: PARP inhibitors for BRCA mutation-associated and BRCA-like solid tumors. Front Oncol 2014 Feb 28;4:42. PMID: 24616882.
    • Moon DH, Lee J-M, Noonan AM, Annunziata CM, et al. Deleterious BRCA1/2 mutation is an independent risk factor for carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions. Br J Cancer 2013 Aug;109(4): 1072-1078. PMID: 23867999.

     
    Book Chapter

    • Lee J-M, Buckley de Meritens A, Moon DH, Kohn EC. Chapter 17: Ovarian Cancer. In Abraham J, Gulley JL, Allegra CJ (Edd.), The Bethesda Handbook of Clinical Oncology, 4th Edition. 2014; Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


    Meeting Abstracts/Presentations

    • Wang K, Pearlstein KA, Mahbooba Z, Sutton S, Motley B, Moon DH, Judy G, Holmes JA, Caster JM, et al.  Xerostomia is an unrecognized complication of whole brain radiotherapy and may be related to parotid dose: A prospective observational trial.  American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Moon DH, McRee AJ, Blackstock AW, O’Neil BH, et al.  Phase 1b/2 study of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with CRLX101 and capecitabine for locally advanced rectal cancer.  American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Moon DH, Basak RS, Chen RC. Patterns of care of node-positive prostate cancer patients across the United States. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Moon DH, Vainshtein JM, DeYoung J, Feng FY, Chepeha DB, Stenmark MH, Eisbruch A. Long-term quality of life (QOL) after chemo-IMRT for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer (OPC): a prospective longitudinal study. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, September 22, 2014. (Oral presentation.)
    • Moon D, Lee J, Noonan A, Annunziata, C, et al.  BRCA 1/2 mutation status is correlated with increased hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin. American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, April 6-10, 2013. (Poster presentation.)
    • Moon D, Mineo M, Fischione A, Hood B, et al. Cell cycle-dependent CDK1 phosphorylation of BAG3 alters proliferation and susceptibility to gemcitabine. Gordon Research Seminar on Cell Growth and Proliferation, West Dover, VT, June 22-23, 2013. (Poster presentation.) 
    • Moon D. A positive BRCA1/2 mutation status is an independent risk factor for carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions. 13th Annual Center for Cancer Research Fellows and Young Investigators Colloquium, Frederick, MD, March 25-26, 2013. (Oral presentation.)
    • Moon D, Han S, Brenner C, Sabolch A, et al. Inhibition of PARP1 selectively radiosensitizes ERG-positive prostate cancer cells. 2010 University of Michigan Cancer Center Research Fall Symposium, Ann Arbor, MI. (Poster presentation.)
    • Moon D, Sabolch A, Albrecht-Unger L, Han S, et al. Targeted radiosensitization of PTEN-mutant prostate cancer with PARP1 inhibition. University of Michigan School of Medicine 56th Annual Student Biomedical Fall Research Forum, Ann Arbor, MI, 2010. (Poster presentation.)

    Dr. Kevin Pearlstein (PGY 4)

    Education

    • Undergraduate: Tufts University, Boston, MA
    • Medical School: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    • Internship: University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC


    Research Interests

    Genitourinary cancers, treatment complications and patient quality of life


    Publications
    (as of 9/12/17)

    • Ye F, Moon DH, Carpenter WR, Reeve BB, Usinger DS, Green RL, Spearman K, Sheets NC, Pearlstein KA, Lucero AR, Waddle MR, Godley PA, Chen RC.  Comparison of patient report and medical records of comorbidities: results from a population-based cohort of patients with prostate cancer. JAMA Oncol 2017 Aug 1;3(8):1035-1042. PMID: 28208186.

    • Diao K, Lobos EA, Yirmibesoglu E, Basak R, Hendrix LH, Barbosa B, Miller SMPearlstein KAGoldin GH, Wang AZ, Chen RC.  Patient-reported quality of life during definitive and post-prostatectomy image-guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer.  Pract Radiat Oncol 2017 Mar-Apr;7(2):e117-e124. [ePub], PMID: 28274402.

    • Pearlstein KA, Chen RC. Comparing dosimetric, morbidity, quality of life, and cancer control outcomes after 3D conformal, intensity-modulated, and proton radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Semin Radiat Oncol 2013 Jul;23(3):182-190. PMID: 23763884.

    • Ye F, Moon DH, Carpenter WR, Reeve BB, Usinger DS, Green RL, Spearman K, Sheets NC, Pearlstein KA, Lucero AR, Waddle MR, Godley PA, Chen RC.  Comparison of patient report and medical records of comorbidities: results from a population-based cohort of patients with prostate cancer. JAMA Oncol 2017 Feb 16. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28208186.

    • Kidd JM, Gravel S, Byrnes J, Moreno-Estrada A, Musharoff S, Bryc K, Degenhardt JD, Brisbin A, Sheth V, Chen R, McLaughlin SF, Peckham HE, Omberg L, Bormann Chung CA, Stanley S, Pearlstein K, et al. Population genetic inference from personal genome data: impact of ancestry and admixture on human genomic variation. Am J Human Genet 2012 Oct; 91(4):660-671. PMID: 23040495.

    • Katz LM, Nauriyal V, Nagaraj S, Finch A, Pearlstein K, et al. Infrared imaging of trauma patients for detection of acute compartment syndrome of the leg. Crit Care Med 2008 Jun;36(6):1756-1761. PMID: 18496371.


    Meeting Abstracts/Presentations (recent)

    • Wang K, Pearlstein KA, Mahbooba Z, Sutton S, et al.   Xerostomia is an unrecognized complication of whole brain radiotherapy and may be related to parotid dose: A prospective observational trial.  American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.) 
    • Wang K, Pearlstein KA, Patchett ND, Deal A, et al. Heart dosimetric analysis of three types of cardiac toxicity in patients treated on dose-escalation trials for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.  American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Pearlstein KA, Basak R, Chen RC. Cardiovascular disease and preventive care among cancer survivors: A population-based study. American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, June 2-6, 2017.  (Poster presentation.)
    • Pearlstein KA, Basak R, Saripalli S, Sun JK, et al. Trajectory of patient-reported urinary and bowel symptom development during modern postprostatectomy radiation therapy.  American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Pearlstein KA, Ramsankar Basak R, Chen RC. Breast cancer patient functional status and comorbidities and their impact on treatment aggressiveness: A population-based study. American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, June 3-7, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Pearlstein KA, Hendrix LH, Chen RC. Patient-level characteristics of Medicare cancer patients in the United States: Implications for treatment and survivorship. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, September 22-25, 2013. (Poster presentation.)
    • Pearlstein KA, Hendrix LH, Chen RC. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and preventive care among U.S. cancer survivors. American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 31 - June 4, 2013. (Poster presentation.)
    • Barbosa BD, Hendrix LH, Pearlstein KA, Chen RC. Treatment patterns for patients with localized (T1-T2) penile squamous cell carcinoma in the United States. American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Symposium, Orlando, FL, February 14–16, 2013. (Poster presentation.)
    • Pearlstein KA, Hendrix LH, Royce TJ, Stokes WA, Chen RC. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and receipt of preventive care among prostate cancer (CaP) survivors in the United States. American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Symposium, Orlando, FL, February 14–16, 2013. (Poster presentation.)
    • Pearlstein KA, Hendrix LH, Chen RC. Quality cancer survivorship care: Receipt of guideline recommended cardiovascular disease (CVD) preventive care among healthy cancer survivors in the United States. American Society for Clinical Oncology Quality Care Symposium, San Diego, CA, November 30 - December 1, 2012. (Poster presentation.)

    Dr. Daniel Lindsay (PGY 3)

    Education

    • Undergraduate: Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
    • Medical School: Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
    • Internship: Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI  


    Honors and Awards

    Medical School:

    • V. Duane Rath Merit Scholarship, 2011-2015
    • Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society (junior year)
    • Gold Humanism Honor Society 


    Publications

    (as of 9/12/17)

    • Lindsay DP, Camara AK, Stowe DF, Lubbe R, Aldakkak M. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca(2+)-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complexes I and III. Front Physiol 2015 Mar 10;6:58. PMID: 25805998.
    • Lindsay DP, Kharofa J, Junck M, Olasz E, Wilson JF. Eruptive keratoacanthomas after radiation therapy for keratoacanthoma centrifugum marginatum. Pract Radiat Oncol 2015 May-Jun;5(3):203-206. PMID: 25432542.
    • Lindsay DP, Camara AK, Stowe DF, Lubbe R, Aldakkak M. Differential effects of buffer pH on Ca(2+)-induced ROS emission with inhibited mitochondrial complexes I and III. Front Physiol 2015 Mar 10;6:58. PMID: 25805998.
    • Crook MB, Lindsay DP, Biggs MB, Bentley JS, Price JC, Clement SC, Clement MJ, Long SR, Griffitts JS. Rhizobial plasmids that cause impaired symbiotic nitrogen fixation and enhanced host invasion. Mol Plant Microbe 2012 Aug;25(8):1026-1033. PMID: 22746823.


    Meeting Abstracts/Presentations (recent)

    • Lindsay DP, Caster JM, Wang K, Myung JH, et al.   Nanotechnology-based quantification of circulating tumor cells in oligometastatic patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Lindsay DP, Caster JM, Wang K, Myung JH, et al. Prospective characterization of circulating tumor cells using a nanotechnology-based capture system in oligometastatic patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy.  American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, June 2-6, 2017.  (Poster presentation.)
    • Bagley JR, Lindsay DP, Tripp P, Firat S. Performance status and comorbidities in patients treated with external beam radiation for intermediate-risk prostate cancer. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, September 14-17, 2014. (Poster presentation.)
    • Lindsay DP, Kharofa JR, Lawton CA, Bylow KA, et al. Toxicities and survival of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with definitive bladder preservation therapy. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, September 22-25, 2013. (Poster presentation.)
    • Lindsay DP, Camara AKS, Stowe DF, Aldakkak M. Differential effects of low pH on Ca2+-induced ROS emission from mitochondrial complexes I and III. The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Scientific Research Conference, Boston, MA, 2013. (Poster presentation.)

    Dr. Brandon Mullins (PGY 3)

    Education

    • Undergraduate: Duke University, Durham, NC
    • Graduate: Hampton University, Hampton, VA
    • Medical School: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC
    • Internship: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 


    Honors and Awards

    Undergraduate:

      • National Urban League Scholarship, 2004-2008
      • Hugh Morson Memorial Scholarship, 2004-2008

    Graduate:

      • Valedictorian, Medical Science Program, 2010

    Medical School:

      • Board of Governors Scholarship, 2010-2015


    Publications
    (as of 7/1/17)

    • Wang K, Mullins BT, Falchook AD, Lian J, He K, Shen D, Dance M, Lin W, Sills TM, Das SK, Huang BY, Chera BS. Evaluation of PET/MRI for tumor volume delineation for head and neck cancer. Front Oncol 2017 Jan 23;7:8. PMID: 28168166.
    • Mullins B, Hackman T.  Angiosarcoma of the head and neck. Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2015 Jul;19(3):191-195. PMID: 26157490.
    • Mullins BT, Hackman T. Adult synovial sarcoma of the head and neck: an institutional study and literature review. J Nat Sci 2015 1(4):e68.  
    • Fried D, Mullins B, Weissler M, Shores C, et al. Prognostic significance of bone invasion for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma considered T1/T2 by American Joint Committee on Cancer size criteria. Head & Neck 2014 Jun;36(6):776-781. PMID: 23616341.    
    • Mullins BT, Hackman T. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the head and neck: A case series and literature review. Case Rep Otolaryngol 2014;2014:368920. PMID: 25548703. 
    • Mullins BT, Hackman T. Adult alveolar soft part sarcoma of the head and neck: A report of two cases and literature review. Case Rep Oncol Med 2014;2014:597291. PMID: 25587475.


    Meeting Abstracts/Presentations 

    • Mullins B, Chen R, Basak R. Patient-reported sexual quality of life (QOL) in prostate cancer amongst 5 different treatment modalities. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, September 24-27, 2017. (Oral presentation.)
    • Nabavizadeh N, Waller JG, Fain R, Chen Y, Elliott DA, Mullins B. Safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy of accelerated hypofractionation for hepatocellular carcinoma in the setting of advanced liver dysfunction. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Wang K, Mullins B, Falchook A, Lian J, et al.  Comparison of tumor volume delineation on magnetic resonance/positron emission tomography versus standard computed tomography: Is there added value? Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium, Scottsdale, AZ, February 18-20, 2016. (Poster presentation.)

    Bryan Rabatic (2017)

    Bryan Rabatic, MD
    Bryan Rabatic (2017)
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    Ankit Agarwal (2017)

    Dr. Ankit Agarwal
    Ankit Agarwal (2017)
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    Brian Beaty (2017)

    Dr. Brian Beaty
    Brian Beaty (2017)
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    Dr. Bryan Rabatic (PGY 5)

    Education

    • Undergraduate: The George Washington University, Washington, DC 
    • Graduate School: Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 
    • Medical School: Rush University Medical College, Chicago, IL 
    • Internship: Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 
    • Residency (2014-2016): Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 


    Honors and Awards

    • Undergraduate:
      • A.D. Britt Scholar, The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.
    • Postdoctoral:
      • Center for Nanoscale Materials Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow,


    Research Interests

    Head and neck cancer, breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiotherapy


    Publications (recent)
    (as of 9/19/17)

    • Rabatic BM, Kong FM. Rebuttal: Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains the ideal treatment in fit patients with large volume unresectable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Transl Lung Cancer Res 2016;5(2):198-200. PMID: 27186515.
    • Rabatic BM, Kong FM. Pros: Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains the ideal treatment in fit patients with large volume unresectable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Transl Lung Cancer Res 2016;5(2):190-194. PMID: 27186513.
    • Zaenger D, Rabatic BM, Dasher B, Mourad WM. Is breast conserving therapy a safe modality for early stage male breast cancer? Clin Breast Cancer 2016;16(2):101-104. PMID: 26718092
    • Amoush A, Dalton A, Rabatic BM, Huang K, Al-Basheer A. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for spine SBRT patients to reduce treatment time and intrafractional motion. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2015;3(2):03026. doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0302.6.   
    • Kurepa J, Paunesku T, Vogt S, Arora H, Rabatic BM, et al. Uptake and distribution of ultrasmall Anatase TiO2 Alizarin red S nanoconjugates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Nano Letters 2010;10(7):2296-302. PMID: 20218662.


    Book Chapters

    • Rabatic BM. Experimental therapies in breast cancer. In: Kauczor, H (ed.), Breast Cancer for the Radiation Oncologist, pp. 81-90. 2015; Berlin & Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag.
    • Arora H, Doty C, Yuan Y, Boyle J, Petras K, Rabatic BM, et al. Titanium dioxide nanocomposites. In Kumar CS (Ed.), Nanomaterials for the Life Sciences, Volume 8: Nanocomposites, pp.1-42. 2010; Weinheim: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.


    Meeting Abstracts/Presentations (recent)

    • Rabatic BM, DeRossi S, Mourad WF, et al. Dynamic changes of major salivary glands during head and neck IMRT. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Rabatic BM, DeRossi S, Mourad WF, et al. Quantitative dose changes due to anatomic and volumetric changes of the parotid glands during concurrent head and neck therapy. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Nettles M, DeRossi S, Mourad, WF, Rabatic BM. Head and neck lymphedema: Reducing a growing problem. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Zaenger D, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Is individualized dose intensification appropriate for inflammatory breast cancer? American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Zaenger D, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Impact of health disparities on outcomes: Do black women with inflammatory breast cancer require individualized treatment intensification? American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Zaenger D, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Modern demographics, oncologic outcomes, and prognostic factors in women with inflammatory breast cancer. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Madden N, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Development of secondary malignant neoplasms in pediatric patients diagnosed with glioblastoma or anaplastic astrocytoma. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Madden N, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Trends in utilization of radiation in the treatment of pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Marascio J, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Evaluating the impact of sentinel node biopsy in Merkel cell carcinoma. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Marascio J, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Oncologic outcome of bi-modality approach for cutaneous adnexal carcinoma. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Marchan E, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. The role of internationally standardized radiosurgery treatment parameters in predicting long term trigeminal neuralgia outcomes. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Amoush A, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Dosimetric study of the effect of the 6D Calypso-compatible couch top and rails for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Shaaban S, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Risk of second primary malignancy in head and neck cancer patients: A population-based study. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, September 25-28, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Madden N, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Factors associated with secondary malignancy in pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma. American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, June 3-7, 2016.  (Poster presentation.)
    • Rabatic BM, DeRossi S, Mourad WF, et al. Chemotherapy-related qualitative, quantitative, anatomic and volumetric changes of the major salivary glands during concurrent head and neck therapy. American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, June 3-7, 2016. (ePoster.)
    • Marascio J, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Renal cell carcinoma: The effect of targeted therapies on clear cell and non-clear cell histologies. American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. Chicago, IL, June 3-7, 2016. (ePoster.)
    • Zaenger D, Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, et al. Mastectomy versus breast conservation for early stage male breast cancer? American Radium Society Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, April 16-19, 2016. (Poster presentation.)
    • Rabatic BM, Ferguson C, Ghamande SA, et al. Real-time robot-assisted interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: Feasibility and toxicity. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, October 18-21, 2015. (Poster presentation.)
    • Rabatic BM, Chen J, Kong FM, et al. Principle component analysis of plasma cytokine changes during SBRT in patients with NSCLC. American Society for Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, October 18-21, 2015. (Poster presentation.)
    • Rabatic BM, Mourad WF, Hu KS, et al. The impact of HPV, HIV, and smoking on oncologic and functional outcomes in patients with head and neck cancer. American Radium Society Annual Meeting, Koloa, HI, May 2-5, 2015. (Oral presentation.)
    • Rabatic BM, Zaenger D, Mourad WF. Oncologic and functional outcomes of salivary gland tumors (SGT) with pathologically proven perineural invasion (PNI). American Radium Society Annual Meeting, Koloa, HI, May 2-5, 2015. (Poster presentation.)
    • Zaenger D, Rabatic BM, Kaminski J, Mourad WF. Long-term functional oncologic outcomes of Esthesioneuroblastoma. American Radium Society Annual Meeting, Koloa, HI, May 2-5, 2015. (Poster presentation.)
    • Zaenger D, Woodall MN, Rabatic BM, et al. Clinical outcomes of Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for painful trigeminal neuropathy. American Radium Society Annual Meeting, Koloa, HI, May 2-5, 2015. (Poster presentation.)
    • Zaenger D, Schulz R, Rabatic BM, et al. From benign CNS SRS therapy to SRS treatments for facetogenic pain: Extrapolating safety. American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, May 2-5, 2015. (Poster presentation.)