News

Site News

Breaking News!! Multidisciplinary Research Grant Received

The Thurston Arthritis Research Center has just received the Notice Of Award from NIAMS* for our P-60 Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center, entitled Mitigating the Public Health Impact of Osteoarthritis.

This 5-year grant will establish our Center as the hub for Osteoarthritis (OA) research on campus and includes a Methodology Core devoted to helping all projects in the Center be successful, discrete teaching on study design and biostatistics, and seminars, among other things.

Joanne Jordan, MD MPH is the Primary Investigator and Director of the Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center and Leigh Callahan, PhD is the Associate Director. Todd Schwartz, DrPH will be chairing the Methodology Core, with Bob DeVellis, PhD as consultant.

Two projects, utilizing two UNC gems, The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project and the JUMP-ACL study, will be led by Drs. Chris Rini and Steve Marshall, respectively. Dr. Rini's study will be looking at people with OA and how a significant other/support person can help with increasing the person's physical activity.  The second study will be following military cadets with who have sustained an ACL tear for the development of early OA.


*NIAMS - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Dr. Edwin Kim serves as Medical Chair for the FARE Walk for Food Allergy

Dr. Kim addresses the crowd with his son, who has a peanut allergy.
Dr. Kim addresses the crowd with his son, who has a peanut allergy.
Dr. Kim served as the 2013 Medical Chair of the Triangle FARE Walk for Food Allergy on September 28, 2013.  Almost 500 people attended the Walk, raising $27,000! The Thurston Arthritis Research Center was proud to sponsor the Triangle FARE Walk for Food Allergy in support of Dr. Kim. The treatment of and investigation of cures for food allergies are very important to Dr. Kim. Congratulations to Dr. Kim on this honor!

Dr. Leigh Callahan and team awarded an R21 grant by the NIH, National Cancer Institute

This new funding will enable the team to explore how an evidence-based physical activity (PA) program – the Arthritis Foundation’s Walk With Ease program – can be adapted for breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitors therapy (AI) therapy to: (1) help them maintain or achieve recommended levels of physical activity, (2) reduce their joint pain/stiffness/achiness, and (3) thereby enable to them to remain on AI therapy as prescribed. Co-Investigators for this study are Christine Rini, PhD, Associate Professor of Health Behavior and a member of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC) and Hyman B. Muss, MD, Director of Geriatric Oncology at the LCCC and breast cancer oncologist at the North Carolina Cancer Hospital. This study represents an important inter-disciplinary research initiative between rheumatology and oncology.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women in the U.S., with an estimated 207,090 new diagnoses in 2010 and a lifetime risk among women born today of 1 in 8. Most breast cancer cases are diagnosed among postmenopausal women at an early and treatable stage, and most of their tumors (70-80%) are hormone-receptor positive. For these women, standard adjuvant endocrine treatment is aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy to prolong disease-free survival and time-to-recurrence. Unfortunately, joint pain/stiffness/ achiness is a common side-effect of AIs, with estimates of joint complaints ranging from 46% to 74% among survivors seen in clinical practice. The precise etiology of AI-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (AIMSS) remains unclear and is complicated by the high prevalence of benign and non-specific musculoskeletal symptoms in the general population of older women, such as arthritis. AI discontinuation due to side-effect severity is an estimated 20-32%, and is of great concern among oncologists. Research is needed to identify effective, easy-to-use, sustainable, and safe alternative or adjunct approaches to AIMSS management, so that breast cancer survivors are able to remain on AI therapy and have a life that is as pain-free as possible.

The Callahan team will investigate whether moderate-intensive physical activity (PA) can provide relief from AIMSS within a sample of female breast cancer survivors on AI therapy who report moderate to severe joint symptoms. Specifically, they will adapt and test the Arthritis Foundation’s Walk With Ease (WWE) program, which is evidence-based for reducing joint pain, stiffness and fatigue among adults with arthritis and is available in a self-directed (non-group) format. All aspects of this study will be informed by Patient Advisors who are part of the Study Team as well as by oncologists who are actively engaged in the design, implementation and analysis of the program.

"Rock The Joint" raises a record-breaking $54,500 to support our Fellowship Program!

"Rock The Joint", a biennial benefit for our center raised a record-breaking $54,500 which will support our Fellowship program!  The event took place on June 21, 2013 in Atlantic Beach and was led by board members and event co-chairs Cathy Ellington and Joan Johnston.  Other board members involved with the success of this event were former event chair Edwina Shaw, Kay Schoellhorn and board co-chairs Charles and Diana Meyer.

Some pictures from the event can be found below:

Nelson Discusses Prolotherapy

Amanda E. Nelson, MD, MSCR discusses prolotherapy and a recent published paper on the use of prolotherapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis.  The discussion appears in Medpage Today as part of the The Gupta Guide.

Duncan and Golightly attend Translational Science Meeting

Elizabeth Duncan, MD, PhD and Yvonne Golightly PT, PhD attended the Translational Science 2013 Meeting in Washington DC recently as part of the KL2 Program,  the Interdisciplinary Clinical Research Career Development at the North Carolina Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute (NC TraCS).

Dr. Duncan presented a poster titled Combination of cigarette smoke exposure and overexpression of the beta-epithelial Na+ channel mimics gene expression changes found in Human Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

 

Dr. Golightly presented a poster titled Foot disorders associated with foot related symptoms and function.

Aging Forum Presentations

Members of Leigh Callahan's Research Team presented posters at the Institute on Aging - Aging Forum on April 18, 2013 at the Carolina Inn.  The forum is a showcase for young researchers to present their research on aging related topics.

Janelle Armstrong-Brown, PhD

Topic:  Association of Racial Residential Segregation and Physical Activity among African Americans 50 and older:  A Mixed Methods Study.

IOA-2013-Kirsten.jpg

Kirsten Nyrop, PhD

Topic:  Feasibility of a walking program to reduce joint pain among breast cancer survivors age 65 and older on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

IOA-2013-MyLinh.jpg

My-Linh Luong, MS

Topic:  The association of socioeconomic status with depressive symptoms and perceived helplessness in people with hip osteoarthritis.

Arthritis Foundation Triangle Walk

The TARC Heels showed true Tar Heel spirit on Saturday, May 4, 2013 at the Arthritis Foundation Triangle Walk.  Wearing Carolina Blue, the team of over 60 people walked and raised over $4000 to benefit the Arthritis Foundation research programs.

AF-Walk-2013-675.jpg

Many thanks to Fran Spivack and Tony Russo (along with Bubbles and Jerzee) for setting up and working the Thurston table.  Many people stopped by to pick up information about the Center.

AF-Walk-2013-Fran-300.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At last count over 600 people walked and donated over $61,000.  The day was gray and windy, but spirits were high as the walkers were treated to entertainment and raffle prizes.  Dr. Adam Dore, a rheumatology fellow at Thurston, took home a gift certificate.AF-Walk-2013-Dore-400.jpg

Art and Medicine

The UNC School of Medicine has reinitiated IRIS, an online Literary and Arts Magazine.  The magazine celebrates the diversity of talents of the students, faculty and staff in the School of Medicine.

A number of pieces by Thurston's Dr. Amanda Nelson were included in this renewed endeavor.

IRIS-2013-Amanda-400.jpg

A reception was held on Friday, May 3, 2013 in the Lobby of the UNC Children's Hospital to showcase a variety of the artistic talents of the participants.

Treating Peanut Allergy

North Carolina legislators are considering a bill that would require that schools have a minimum of two EpiPens and people trained to use them.  An EpiPen is an epinephrine auto-injector used for severe allergic reactions. In a recent interview with WRAL-TV, Dr. Edwin Kim, spoke about the importance of kids having access to appropriate treatment.  Dr. Kim is part of research team that is studying immunotherapies for children with peanut allergies.

EpiPen-2013-400.jpg

Dr. Edwin Kim (right) with his patient in the study, Patrick Campfield (center), and his dad, Ray Campfield (left).

Filed under: