Images

Folder for images

Whole blood clot
Cover art
Tissue factor-initiated coagulation
Scanning electron micrograph of a whole blood clot
Fibrin fibers over cell surface
TF initiated Coagulation
Transmission electron micrograph of a whole blood clot
Normal & hemophilic plasma clots
Hemophilic clot
Normal clot
Rouloux
TEM A
TEM B
Whole blood clot B
Virchow's triad
Flow
Flow
Static
Static
Flow influences fibrin structure
Elevated fibrinogen and thrombosis
Carotid
Saphenous
Normal
Hemo
Virchow triad
Virchow's triad revisited
Arterial thrombosis
Interplay between abnormalities in blood components, the vasculature, and blood flow contribute to the development of arterial thrombosis. Arterial thrombosis involves the formation of platelet-rich “white clots” that form after rupture of atherosclerotic plaques and exposure of procoagulant material such as lipid-rich macrophages (foam cells), collagen, tissue factor, and/or endothelial breach, in a high shear environment. TM = thrombomodulin; II = prothrombin; IIa = thrombin; Fgn = fibrinogen; TF = tissue factor.
Venous thrombosis
Interplay among abnormalities in blood components, the vasculature, and blood flow contribute to the development of venous thrombosis. Venous thrombosis involves the formation of fibrin-rich “red clots” that result from exposure of procoagulant activity on intact endothelium plus plasma hypercoagulability, in reduced or static blood flow. Venous thrombi are thought to initiate behind valve pockets, in which reduced or static flow decreases wall shear stress that normally regulates endothelial cell phenotype. TM = thrombomodulin; EPCR = endothelial protein C receptor; II = prothrombin; IIa = thrombin; TF = tissue factor; Fgn = fibrinogen; RBC = red blood cells.
Microparticles
Circulating microparticles are derived from a variety of cell types including leukocytes, platelets, megakaryocytes, red blood cells, endothelial cells, and tumors. Microparticles (MP) carry cell-specific markers and functional properties of their parent cell.
Venn diagram
Arterial Thrombosis
Venous Thrombosis
Microparticles
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