2005


New School of Medicine Mail Server Information  
December 20, 2005 — During the 2005 holiday break, OIS will be changing to a new, substantially larger mail server that will enable us to add many significant enhancements to our mail service. Please follow the link below to find out more about the improved mail service and how the migration may affect you.


UNC Thurston Arthritis Research Center receives $100,000 gift for lupus research  
December 12, 2005 — A private foundation in Charlotte has donated a major gift to support lupus research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The L. Jack and Ella Shaw Spiers Foundation contributed $100,000 to the UNC Thurston Arthritis Research Center to explore the causes and mechanisms of lupus.


Bioterrorism, infection surveillance system receives national award for excellence  
December 5, 2005 — A computerized system developed by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and N.C. Division of Public Health experts to detect bioterrorism and infectious disease outbreaks has received a prestigious national award for excellence.


Study: Brain activity related to processing faces is similar in people with, without autism  
December 2, 2005 — New brain imaging research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill indicates that when people with autism look at a face, activity in the brain area that responds is similar to that of people without autism. The finding is surprising, as it is widely known that autistic individuals tend to avoid looking directly at faces.


Study links low selenium levels with higher risk of osteoarthritis  
November 28, 2005 — People without enough selenium in their bodies face a higher risk of knee osteoarthritis, a first-of-its-kind new study suggests. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Thurston Arthritis Center medical scientists and colleagues conducted the research.


Gift creates professorship, endowment to support UNC’s Thurston Arthritis Research Center  
November 14, 2005 — A $3 million gift to the Thurston Arthritis Research Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine will support the center’s efforts to recruit and retain top faculty, as well as fund part of its research mission.


New discovery: if it weren’t for this enzyme, decomposing pesticide would take millennia  
October 31, 2005 — An enzyme inside a bacterium that grows in the soil of potato fields can -- in a split second -- break down residues of a common powerful pesticide used for killing worms on potatoes, researchers have found. That may be expensive for farmers but lucky for the environment because University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists have now discovered that if that particular enzyme weren’t there, it would take 10,000 years for just half of the widely used pesticide to decompose.


UNC wins eight top NIH “Roadmap” grants, more than any other university in the country  
October 13, 2005 — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill health scientists have garnered more grants – eight – from the National Institutes of Health’s highly competitive Roadmap program than any other university in the nation. They also have secured funding for a center to combat cancer through the latest in basic science technology. In 2004 – the inaugural year of the NIH Roadmap grant program – six grants were awarded to Carolina researchers.


UNC Lineberger receives one of seven large NCI grants for small science  
October 10, 2005 — The National Cancer Institute has named the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center as one of seven institutions nationwide in the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer. The funds for the first year of this five-year award total $3,899,965 and will establish the Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence.


Memorial Service for William C. Koller, MD, PhD  
October 7, 2005 — A memorial service for Dr. William C. Koller will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, October 8th at UNC-CH's William C. Friday Center. Dr. Koller was a professor of neurology and director of the UNC Movement Disorders Division.


Study points to molecular origin of neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington’s disease  
October 3, 2005 — New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine points to the possible molecular origin of at least nine human diseases of nervous system degeneration. The findings are currently in PLoS Computational Biology, an open-access journal published by the Public Library of Science (PloS) in partnership with the International Society for Computational Biology.


Fall Faculty Meeting: September 29th, 4:45pm  
September 26, 2005 — The School of Medicine Fall Faculty Meeting will take place on Thursday, September 29, 2005 from 4:45-5:45 p.m. in 103 Berryhill Hall.


Hurricane Katrina Response  
September 12, 2005 — Find out more about UNC Healthcare and university response to Hurricane Katrina.


New magnetic resonance imaging technique is useful in early detection of pancreatic cancer  
September 6, 2005 — Research conducted at the University of North Carolina Hospitals shows that a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique is very successful for early detection of pancreatic cancer. "This work is an important, major advance. The essence of this work is that very early detection of pancreatic cancer is possible with MRI that is not possible with other modalities," said Dr. Richard C. Semelka, the study’s principal investigator.


Carolina scientist recognized as one of nation's top young researchers by W.M. Keck Foundation  
August 16, 2005 — A faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been honored with one of the nation's most prestigious awards for young scientists. The W.M. Keck Foundation named Dr. Brian Kuhlman, assistant professor of biochemistry and biophysics in the UNC School of Medicine, to its 2005 W. M. Keck Distinguished Young Scholars in Medical Research Program.


The Best Doctors in America  
August 5, 2005 — More than 100 physicians in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine who provide patient care at UNC Hospitals are included in the latest compilation of The Best Doctors in America® database.


Health Affairs Marks Medicare, Medicaid 40th Anniversaries  
July 28, 2005 — As Medicare and Medicaid celebrate their fortieth anniversaries on July 30, Health Affairs today is publishing on its Web site a retrospective authored by former program administrators on the evolution and challenges faced by the programs.


UNC receives one of world’s most advanced biomedical instruments for study of proteins  
July 19, 2005 — The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill now owns one of the world’s most advanced biomedical instruments for identifying unknown proteins, a device that incorporates the most powerful magnet ever made for research into cellular proteins and DNA.


Norma Connell Berryhill, ‘first lady’ of UNC School of Medicine, dies at 103  
July 11, 2005 — Norma Connell Berryhill, a longtime leader within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine community whose name came to symbolize Southern hospitality and selfless public service, died today (July 8) at Carolina Meadows in Chapel Hill. She was 103.


Surgical robot ‘scrubs in’ at UNC, may be more precise than conventional surgery  
June 27, 2005 — The new surgical assistant at the University of North Carolina Hospitals arrived in February sporting three arms, a computerized brain and a glowing track record in helping to repair heart valves, remove cancerous prostates, bypass blocked coronary arteries and perform gastric bypass operations for morbid obesity.


Colon cancer prevention to be topic of webcast, broadcast Friday  
June 9, 2005 — Strategies for preventing colorectal cancer will be the topic of a Friday (June 10) program sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Public Health, in partnership with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Collaborating to Conquer Colorectal Cancer: Fulfilling the Promise of Prevention," an hour-long webcast and satellite broadcast, is part of the Public Health Grand Rounds series.


UNC launches study of liver injury caused by drugs  
May 31, 2005 — The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is one of five clinical centers nationwide to receive funds from the National Institutes of Health to study why good medications are sometimes bad for the liver. During the next seven years, the Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network, or DILIN, will study patients who have suffered severe liver injury caused by...


Protein helps regulate the genes of embryonic stem cells; findings offer new ideas on disease states  
May 25, 2005 — New research from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows how a protein may be crucial to the regulation of genes in embryonic stem cells. The protein, called "eed," is needed for an essential chemical modification of many genes. Embryos cannot survive without the modification.


Umbilical cord-blood transplants save lives of babies with rare genetic disorder, help them develop,  
May 20, 2005 — Umbilical cord-blood transplants save the lives of newborns with a rare genetic disorder called Krabbe’s disease and help their brains develop more normally, a study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University Medical Center concludes.


Spring Faculty Meeting: May 19th, 4:45pm  
May 16, 2005 — The School of Medicine Spring Faculty Meeting will take place on Thursday, May 19, 2005 from 4:45-5:45 p.m. in 103 Berryhill Hall.


Study: statewide teen tobacco prevention media campaign shows early successes  
May 3, 2005 — Efforts to persuade children and adolescents not to use tobacco should receive a strong boost this week as University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers release encouraging results of the first in-depth study of a statewide, paid antismoking media campaign.


Gene associated with breast cancer may play major role in prostate cancer recurrence  
April 22, 2005 A gene associated with breast cancer also may play a major role in the recurrence of prostate cancer, according to new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.


U.S. service academies to collaborate with UNC, Andrews Air Force Base, Duke in knee injury study  
April 12, 2005 — The U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force academies – fierce rivals on the sports field – soon will cooperate on a $2.8-million study of risk factors for a common knee injury among athletes. The study, led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Injury Prevention Research Center, Duke University and Andrews Air Force Base, will enroll 4,800 male and female cadets...


Study: Injectable drug, combined with counseling, shows promise in treating alcohol dependence  
April 6, 2005 — Research led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with 23 other sites nationwide has found that long-acting injections of the drug naltrexone, combined with psychotherapy, significantly reduced heavy drinking in patients being treated for alcohol dependence.


Howard Hughes Medical Institute selects Zhang as new investigator, a first for UNC’s biomedical faculty  
March 23, 2005 — The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has selected Dr. Yi Zhang, associate professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, as one of its new investigators. Zhang was tapped by the medical institute today (March 21), along with 42 other promising biomedical scientists nationwide.


Brain imaging study may hold clues to onset of schizophrenia in people at high risk  
March 16, 2005 — Images of brain activity may hold clues to the onset of schizophrenia in people at high risk for the disease, according to a study headed by psychiatry researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine. The new findings appear in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, a journal of the American Medical Association.


Soap and water work best in ridding hands of disease viruses  
March 15, 2005 — The largest, most comprehensive study ever done comparing the effectiveness of hand hygiene products shows that nothing works better in getting rid of disease-causing viruses than simply washing one’s hands with good old-fashioned soap and water.


UNC findings may help explain cause of most common movement disorder  
March 2, 2005 — Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill may have identified the genetic basis underlying essential tremor disease, the most common human movement disorder. The discovery comes from studies involving a strain of genetically altered mice that show the same types of tremor and similar lack of coordination as people affected by essential tremor.


California researcher to receive neuroscience prize endowed by UNC scientist Perl  
February 23, 2005 — The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has named Dr. Roger Tsien the recipient of the fifth annual Perl-UNC Neuroscience Prize. Tsien is professor of pharmacology, chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California at San Diego. The prize carries a $10,000 award and is given to recognize a seminal achievement in neuroscience.


Embryonic stem cells treated with growth factor reverse hemophilia in mice: UNC researchers  
February 15, 2005 — University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers have made a discovery that may have implications for the treatment of liver-based genetic defects such as hemophilia A and B in humans. Mouse embryonic stem cells treated in culture with a growth factor and then injected into the liver reverse a form of hemophilia in mice...


Friends' Cafe Opens in the Health Sciences Library  
February 7, 2005 — The new Friends' Café is now open in the Health Sciences Libary. It was created with the intention of providing a comfortable space for collaboration amongst all health affairs students and faculty. Library users can get a cup of coffee and a bite to eat without leaving campus or the convenience of wireless Internet access.


Women doctors fete UNC’s Etta Pisano for her contributions to medical science  
February 3, 2005 — The American Medical Women’s Association honored a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill medical scientist and clinician over the weekend (Jan. 28) for her contributions toward saving lives by detecting breast cancer earlier. Dr. Etta Pisano is professor of radiology at the UNC School of Medicine...


UNC series ‘Narratives of HIV’ to explore stories of HIV, AIDS  
January 28, 2005 — As part of an ongoing series at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, author Greg Behrman will speak Monday (Jan. 31) in the Cobb Theatre of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History. His 7 p.m. lecture is part of the "Narratives of HIV" series, running through Feb. 9 and free to the public. The series explores the many facets of a worldwide epidemic.


School of Medicine Winter Faculty Meeting: Thursday, January 27, 2005, 4:45-5:45, 103 Berryhill  
January 24, 2005 — Ten months into the new administration, Dean Bill Roper and Vice Dean Bob Golden will present overviews and updates on strategic planning processes for both the Health Care System and School of Medicine respectively. Between these two presentations, Marschall Runge, President of UNC Physicians, will provide an update on the Navigant consultant recommendations.


UNC program seeks to cut secondhand smoke, offers stickers to get the message to restaurants  
January 14, 2005 — If you’re one of many people who made a New Year’s resolution to quit smoking, you can increase your chances of success by avoiding smoky places, according to Melanie Miller, associate program coordinator of the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Training, Education, and Research (EnTER) Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Study pinpoints protein’s role in heart failure prevention  
January 4, 2005 — Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have shown that a protein in cardiac muscle cells may play a crucial role in heart failure prevention. The protein is known technically by the unusual acronym MuRF1, or muscle-specific RING finger 1, and helps regulate cardiac cellular molecules involved in abnormal enlargement of the heart.

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