June

UNC scientists tackle viral mysteries

Monday, June 29, 2009 — Scientists know that some cancers are triggered by viruses, which take over cellular systems and cause uncontrolled cell growth. Doctors – and patients who get shingles late in life – have also known for many years that some viruses, particularly the herpes virus, can lie dormant in a person’s cells for long periods of time and then reactivate, causing disease. These viruses also cause significant disease in immunosuppressed people and those living with HIV/AIDS.

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UNC study: Aerobic activity may keep the brain young

Monday, June 29, 2009 — In the UNC study, to be published July 9 in the American Journal of Neuroradiology, physically active elderly people showed healthier cerebral blood vessels than those who are not active.

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UNC neurosurgeon uses through-the-nose approach to clip ruptured brain aneurysm

Thursday, June 25, 2009 — The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine's Department of Surgery has performed its first clipping of a ruptured brain aneurysm through a patient's nose. It is the first ever reported case of the procedure.

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UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine professor receives national award

Friday, June 19, 2009 — Rick Segal, Ph.D., professor and director of the Division of Physical Therapy in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, has been elected as a 2009 Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association, the most prestigious recognition granted by the organization. Segal received the honor at a ceremony in Baltimore recently as part of the association’s annual national conference.

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N.C. Children's Hospital ranked as one of the best in the nation

Thursday, June 18, 2009 — N.C. Children's Hospital is one of the best children's hospitals in the nation, according to U.S. News Media Group's 2009 edition of America's Best Children's Hospitals, the most extensive listing of its kind. The publication has recognized N.C. Children’s Hospital as eleventh in the nation among those caring for children with respiratory disorders. The ranking will appear online at www.usnews.com/childrenshospitals and be featured in the August issue of U.S. News & World Report, available on newsstands starting July 21.

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Research uncovers clues to virus-cancer link

Research uncovers clues to virus-cancer link

Wednesday, June 17, 2009 — In a series of recently-published articles, a research team from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center has uncovered clues to the development of cancers in AIDS patients.

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Resident physician discusses caring for patients from explosion

Tuesday, June 16, 2009 — Cathy Sybert, chief resident of the N.C. Jaycee Burn Center, gives an update on patients injured in the ConAgra food plant explosion.

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Test detects molecular marker of aging in humans

Tuesday, June 16, 2009 — A team of UNC researchers has proven that a key protein called p16INK4a is present in human blood and is strongly correlated both with chronological age and with certain behaviors such as tobacco use and physical inactivity, which are known to accelerate the aging process.

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Family House Diaries: House fire yields gratitude of life-changing magnitude

Family House Diaries: House fire yields gratitude of life-changing magnitude

Monday, June 15, 2009 — This is the second in a new series from UNC Health Care that focuses on the stories of UNC Hospitals patients and their families who live in the SECU Family House at UNC Hospitals while receiving or awaiting treatment.

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Innovative summer camp utilizes constraint-induced movement therapy to help kids with hemiplegia

Monday, June 15, 2009 — The joy of summer camp is a lifelong memory every child deserves. But what if motor function challenges precluded your child from participating in a traditional camp experience? Thanks to one occupational therapist from N.C. Children's Hospital, hemiplegic children in North Carolina have access to a summer day camp that combines traditional camp activities with therapy made fun.

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Study suggests new approach to common cause of blindness

Sunday, June 14, 2009 — Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine in collaboration with lead investigators at the University of Kentucky have identified a new target for the diagnosis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration, the most common cause of blindness in older Americans.

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N.C. Children's Hospital's chief physician to appear on NBC 17's live medical call-in show, Rex On Call

Thursday, July 11, 2009 — Dr. Alan Stiles, chief physician at N.C. Children’s Hospital and chair of pediatrics at the UNC School of Medicine, will be the featured guest on the Triangle-based, live medical television program, Rex On Call with Melody Hunter-Pillion. Dr. Stiles will discuss the state of pediatric care in North Carolina and take questions from viewers about pediatric health issues. The program will air Saturday, June 13, at 7:30 p.m. on NBC 17.

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UNC scientists identify growth factor as possible cancer drug target

Tuesday, June 9, 2009 — To grow and spread, tumors need new blood vessels, a process called angiogenesis. One growth factor that causes angiogenesis has been identified - vascular endothelial growth factor or VEGF - and drugs to inhibit VEGF are already in use. But not all tumors respond to the therapy initially or over the long term. Thus new growth factors need to be identified to aid in developing the next generation of angiogenesis inhibitors.

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New drug taken once daily shows promise for type 2 diabetes

Monday, June 8, 2009 — A study led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine researchers has shown that the investigational new drug liraglutide taken once daily may be safer and more effective than currently available medications for people with type 2 diabetes.

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Hearing things differently now

Wednesday, June 3, 2009 — Cochlear implants are nothing new. They have been around since the 1980s. However, the implant is helping to change the lives of millions of Americans that are hard of hearing; some of them hearing for the first time in a long time.

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Study: Autism drug citalopram is ineffective, causes significant side effects

Monday, June 1, 2009 — A drug commonly given to autistic children to reduce repetitive behaviors is ineffective compared to placebo and, in some children, may actually increase repetitive behaviors, the largest study of autistic children to date has found.

Study: Autism drug citalopram is ineffective, causes significant side effects - Read More…