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UNC neurology professor appointed to national credentialing body

March 12, 2008 — Dr. James F. Howard Jr., distinguished professor of neuromuscular disease in the UNC School of Medicine’s neurology department, has been appointed to the Board of Directors of the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (ABEM).

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UNC Board of Governors endorses plan to expand medical education in North Carolina

March 7, 2008 — In an effort to address an expected shortage of doctors in North Carolina, the University of North Carolina Board of Governors today (March 7, 2008) endorsed a plan to expand medical education at the state's public medical schools.

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Doctors mentor Covenant Scholars about medical school

March 5, 2008 — Media representatives are invited to cover a class in which five of the top doctors at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill take time out of their clinic schedules to help low-income undergraduates decide whether medical school is right for them.

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Computer simulations point to key molecular basis of cystic fibrosis

March 3, 2008 — Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have identified a key molecular mechanism that may account for the development of cystic fibrosis.

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Peter Leone appointed to board of National Coalition of STD Directors

February 26, 2008 — Dr. Peter A. Leone, an expert on sexually transmitted diseases and an associate professor in the UNC schools of Medicine and Public Health, has been appointed to the board of directors of the National Coalition of STD Directors (NCSD).

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Back by Popular Demand: 2008 UNC Mini-Medical School

February 25, 2008 — Ever wanted to learn how to perform a tracheotomy? Wish you could remove a bone spur? Well, while the latest installment of the UNC School of Medicine’s annual Mini-Medical School will not equip participants with that level of skill and knowledge, the three-part weekly series is designed to give lay audiences first hand experience with the science underlying the practice of modern medicine. Topics on the agenda this year include research and clinical perspectives on aging, GI reflux disease, stroke prevention and the many faces of dementia.

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UNC cancer center scientist awarded lung cancer research grant

February 19, 2008 — The National Lung Cancer Partnership has awarded Dr. Albert Baldwin, a researcher at UNC’s Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a two-year $100,000 LUNGevity Foundation Research Grant.

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Parents support ban on secondhand smoke in public places, higher cigarette taxes

February 12, 2008 — The results of an annual survey show that North Carolina parents support stepping up the state’s anti-smoking efforts, including higher cigarette taxes and no-smoking policies in public places frequented by youth.

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Discovery of "overdrive" protein could broaden drug design options

February 12, 2008 — New research by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows for the first time that an important family of proteins known to function at the cell surface also functions at a site within the cell.

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Magnesium sulfate infusions reduce cerebral palsy risk in preterm births

January 31, 2008 — Giving an infusion of magnesium sulfate just before delivery to pregnant women who were at high risk for preterm birth cut the rate of cerebral palsy in the children born by half, a new study found.

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Digital mammography superior to film mammography in some cases

January 29, 2008 — For some women, digital mammography may be a better screening option than film mammography, according to newly published results from a national study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Lineberger joins Lance Armstrong Foundation Survivorship Network

January 28, 2008 — The Lance Armstrong Foundation today announced that the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center has joined the LIVESTRONG Survivorship Center of Excellence Network to address the needs of the growing number of cancer survivors in the United States. Lineberger is the eighth network member institution in the nation.

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UNC-Chapel Hill, ECU team up on cancer care, research

January 22, 2008 — The University of North Carolina’s two medical schools and their cancer centers have signed a memorandum of understanding that creates a partnership to advance cancer research and bring leading-edge treatment to North Carolinians.

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UNC, Duke lead first statewide shaken baby prevention research project in U.S.

January 15, 2008 — Child abuse prevention experts from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Injury Prevention Research Center and School of Medicine and Duke University Medical Center will undertake a $7 million statewide shaken baby prevention project.

UNC, Duke lead first statewide shaken baby prevention research project in U.S. - Read More…

People with anorexia less likely to be blamed when biology, genetics explained

January 9, 2008 — People given a biological and genetics-based explanation for the causes of anorexia nervosa were less likely to blame people with anorexia for their illness than those given a sociocultural explanation, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study found.

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