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Course Descriptions

Human Anatomy

PASC 701
Credit: 4 hours

This one-semester clinical anatomy unit prepares the student for clinical practice with an understanding of the functional and applied anatomy stressing the normal landmarks and common clinical findings. Cadaver gross dissections and pro-sections, anatomical models, lectures and electronic resources are utilized in this course.

Physiology

PASC 702
Credit: 2 hours

This foundation course for the clinical medicine courses will provide an understanding of human physiology at the cellular, tissue and organ levels. The importance of physiology and pathophysiology to the study of clinical medicine will be reinforced. This course lays the foundation foundations for disease etiology, management and prevention.

Foundations of Medical Science

PASC 703
Credit: 2 hours

An introduction to the genetic and molecular mechanisms of disease; biochemistry; microbiology; and basic principles of pharmacology. Instruction in the genetic basis of disease and clinical genetic disorders will serve as a foundation for the Clinical Medicine Courses (PASC 710,720, 730) to understand genotypic specific diagnoses, prevention, and therapy. The biochemistry and microbiology modules will additionally prepare students to apply the knowledge and principles to gain an improved understanding of organ systems and related diseases in the Clinical Medicine Courses (PASC 710,720, 730). Basic pharmacology concepts will prepare students for the Pharmacology and Therapeutics Courses (PASC 711, 721, 731).

History & Physical Examination

PASC 704
Credit: 4 hours

This semester long course introduces the student to the art of acquiring a patient history and performing the physical examination. Instruction in interpersonal and communication skills resulting in effective acquiring of patient history and collaboration with patients, families and other health professionals will be incorporated. Using weekly lecture and laboratory format the course will detail how to obtain a medical history, and perform a complete physical examination.

Professional Practice and the Health System I

PASC 705
Credit: 1 hour

This is part one of a two-part course provides an introduction to the social, regulatory, ethical and professional aspects of the PA profession. The history, development and current status of the PA profession within the context of the US health care system including professional conduct, legal issues, scope of PA practice, and economic aspects. Instruction in intellectual honesty, academic and professional conduct will be covered.

Clinical Medicine I

PASC 710
Credit: 4 hours

This is the first of three didactic Clinical Medicine courses presented in the first year and will cover cardiology including EKG, hematology/oncology and pulmonology. The course will concentrate on the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, management and prevention of disease across the human life span; organized into an organ system approach. Clinical information will be correlated with information taught in Diagnostic Methods I (PASC 713) and Pharmacology and Therapeutics (PASC 711). Course format includes lectures, small group case studies, assessment of standardized patients. Small group cases and assessment of standardized patients will be selected to provide understanding of disease presentation, opportunities for prevention, medical ethics, interpersonal and communication skills that result in the effective exchange of information and collaboration with patients, their families and other health professionals. Problem solving and medical decision-making skills will be emphasized.

Pharmacology and Therapeutics I

PASC 711
Credit: 3 hours

This first in a series of three courses begins with an introduction to the principles of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, drug interactions, adverse reactions and human behavior impacting adherence and therapeutics. Patient safety will be addressed through understanding of the risks and benefits of drug treatment, drug interactions and adverse reactions. The student will also be introduced to the drug reference resources. Drugs will be introduced in conjunction with the clinical medicine units that are taught this semester and students will learn to individualize pharmacologic regimens based on drug specific parameters, clinical evidence, drug safety and cost.

Diagnostic Methods I

PASC 713
Credit: 2 hours

The essentials of ordering, interpreting and performing diagnostic studies used in the screening, diagnosis, management and monitoring of disease. Topics for this course are congruent with Clinical Medicine I (PASC 710). Course format includes lectures and small group discussions.

Clinical Medicine II

PASC 720
Credit: 8 hours

This is the second of three didactic Clinical Medicine courses presented in the first year and will cover Dermatology, Otolaryngology, Urology, Nephrology, Endocrinology, Women’s Health, and Infectious Diseases. The course will concentrate on the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, management and prevention of disease across the human life span; organized into an organ system approach. Clinical information will be correlated with information taught in Patient Assessment (PASC 722) and Pharmacology and Therapeutics (PASC 721). Course format includes lectures, small group case studies, assessment of standardized patients. Small group cases and assessment of standardized patients will be selected to provide understanding of disease presentation, opportunities for prevention, medical ethics, interpersonal and communication skills that result in the effective exchange of information and collaboration with patients, their families and other health professionals. Problem solving and medical decision-making skills will be emphasized.

Pharmacology and Therapeutics II

PASC 721
Credit: 2 hours

This second in a series of three courses will build on the principles in PASC 711. The course will concentrate on therapeutic applications of drugs for various organ systems integrated with the clinical medicine (PASC 720) units being taught during this semester. Patient safety will be addressed through understanding of the risks and benefits of drug treatment, drug interactions and adverse reactions. The course format includes lecture, case studies and small group sessions.

Patient Assessment I

PASC 722
Credit: 3 hours

Building on knowledge gained in History and Physical Exam (PASC 704), this course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to obtain and record the complete medical history, use the appropriate equipment, techniques, and medical terminology to document findings; develop a differential diagnosis and diagnostic work-up and suggest a treatment plan. Formal history and physical write-ups along with oral patient presentations will be evaluated by program faculty. Professional conduct will be an important component of patient assessment.

Diagnostic Methods II

PASC 723
Credit: 1 hour

This course provides instruction in the essentials of ordering, interpreting and performing diagnostic studies used in the screening, diagnosis, management and monitoring of disease. Topics for this course are congruent with Clinical Medicine II (PASC 720) and Pharmacology and Therapeutics II (PASC 721). Course format includes lecture, independent review of modules, in class case discussions, and small group discussions. Completion of this course enables students to order, interpret, supervise, and perform laboratory procedures commonly utilized in a primary care, out-patient or hospital setting for screening, diagnosing and managing common disease states.

Behavioral Medicine

PASC 727
Credit: 2 hours

This course is an introduction to psychiatric disorders and behavioral medicine. Presented in lecture and seminar format the major psychiatric disorders are studied. DSM-V classification is covered, as is interviewing and office counseling. Clinical reasoning exercises include small-group clinical case study discussions, led by experienced clinicians, which are utilized to develop problem solving skills.

Clinical Medicine III

PASC 730
Credit: 5 hours

This is the third didactic Clinical Medicine courses presented in the first year and will cover Gastroenterology, Neurology, Orthopedics, Ophthalmology, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, and Geriatrics. The course will concentrate on the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, management and prevention of disease; organized into an organ system approach. Clinical information will be correlated with information taught in Pharmacology and Therapeutics (PASC 731) and Patient Assessment II (PASC 732). Course format includes lectures, small group case studies, assessment of standardized patients. Small group cases and assessment of standardized patients will be selected to provide understanding of disease presentation, opportunities for prevention, medical ethics, interpersonal and communication skills that result in the effective exchange of information and collaboration with patients, their families and other health professionals. Problem solving and medical decision-making skills will be emphasized.

Pharmacology and Therapeutics III

PASC 731
Credit: 3 hours

This third in a series of four courses will build on the principles in PASC 711. The course will concentrate on therapeutic applications of drugs for various organ systems integrated with the clinical medicine (PASC 730) unit being taught during this semester. Patient safety will be addressed through understanding of the risks and benefits of drug treatment, drug interactions and adverse reactions. The course format includes lecture, case studies and small group sessions.

Patient Assessment II

PASC 732
Credit: 3 hours

Building on knowledge gained in History and Physical Exam (PASC 704) and Patient Assessment I, this course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to obtain and record the complete medical history, use the appropriate equipment, techniques, and medical terminology to document findings; develop a differential diagnosis and diagnostic work-up and suggest a treatment plan. Formal history and physical write-ups along with oral patient presentations will be evaluated by program faculty. Professional conduct will be an important component of patient assessment.

Diagnostic Methods III

PASC 733
Credit: 2 hours

The essentials of ordering interpreting and performing diagnostic studies used in the screening, diagnosis, management and monitoring of disease. Topics for this course are congruent with Clinical Medicine III (PASC 730) and Pharmacology and Therapeutics III (PASC 731). Course format includes lectures, and small group case discussions. Completion of this course enables students to order, interpret, supervise, and perform laboratory procedures commonly utilized in primary care, out-patient or hospital settings for screening, diagnosing and managing common disease states.

Fundamentals of Surgery

PASC 734
Credit: 3 hours

This course is designed to orient the student to the fundamentals of surgical practice including basic clinical procedures, sterile procedure, anesthesia, suturing, and common office procedures. Pre-operative and post-operative patient care is presented. Hands-on laboratory training of surgical skills required for performing minor procedures is a component of this course.

Professional Practice and the Health System II

PASC 735
Credit: 1 hour

This second part of a two part course will introduce the students to providing medical care to diverse patient populations in a fluid and changing health care system. This course continues the discussion on professional development topics pertinent to employment and practice including medical ethics, licensing and credentialing, medical coding and billing, malpractice issues, career growth and leadership.

Evidence-Based Medicine I

PASC 736
Credit: 2 hours

This one semester course is an introduction to Evidence-based Medicine (EBM), and prepares the student for their Capstone project. Intellectual and academic professionalism are incorporated into this course. Evidence based-medicine provides tools to assist clinicians to make accurate diagnoses and select optimal treatment for their patients. This course will review statistical concepts, the epidemiologic basis for clinical research, and research ethics, and will teach students to formulate clinical questions, search and critically appraise the medical literature, and incorporate best evidence into their practice. The course content is presented in lecture format with small group discussions.