Recent News

UNC graduate students winners at 2010 Global Venture Challenge
Chemical tags likely to affect metabolism, cancer development
New research in the lab of Dr. Yue Xiong, Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, suggest that the addition or removal of a certain type of chemical tag - called an acetyl group - onto metabolic enzymes plays a key role in how cellular metabolism is regulated.
Maness article featured on cover of Journal of Neuroscience
Congratulations to researchers in the lab of Dr. Patricia Maness, Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, whose article "ALCAM Regulates Mediolateral Retinotopic Mapping in the Superior Colliculus" was featured on the cover of the December 16, 2009 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.
Brian Strahl presenting Hettleman Lecture on March 26, 2010
Jean Cook Receives 2010 Jefferson-Pilot Fellowship
Congratulations to Dr. Jeanette Cook, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics, who received the 2010 Jefferson-Pilot Fellowship in Academic Medicine.
Secrets in the Salt - Jack Griffith filmed on NOVA's scienceNOW
Congratulations to Dr. Jack Griffith, Distinguished Professor or Microbiology & Immunology and Biochemistry & Biophysics whose work was highlighted in a special NOVA scienceNOW video series (originally aired in July 2009).
Grad Student Andrew Hemmert receives 2010 GEAB Impact Award
Congratulations to Andrew Hemmert, doctoral student of Biochemistry & Biophysics whose research was recognized by the Graduate Education Advancement Board (GEAB) at UNC-CH.
Looking at DNA through the Electron Microscope: the work of Jack Griffith
Congratulations to Dr. Jack Griffith, Distinguished Professor of Microbiology & Immunology and Biochemistry & Biophysics whose work was reprinted as a classic to commemorate the centennial of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
DNA Repair Mechanisms: the Work of Aziz Sancar
Congratulations to Dr. Aziz Sancar, Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics whose work was reprinted as a classic to commemorate the centennial of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
New paradigms in Ras research
Ras is a family of genes encoding small GTPases involved in cellular signal transduction. If their signals are dysregulated, Ras proteins can cause cancer. Dr. Sharon Campbell explains her lab’s research into a novel mechanism for regulation of Ras proteins by reactive free radical species.