Foundation Phase Semester 2

 Medical Science Course 2 MTEC 102 | Patient Centered Care Course 2 MTEC 112 | Social and Health Systems Course 2 MTEC 122 

Medical Science Course 2: MTEC 102 (15 credit hours)

This course provides a cohesive understanding of normal and abnormal functions of the respiratory, urinary, gastrointestinal, and neurologic systems. The course also demonstrates integration with Professional Development 2 and Patient Centered Care 2.
Duration: Monday-Friday; Spring Semester (January-May)

MTEC-Medical Science Course 2 Graphic

Medical Science Course 2 is made up of four blocks.  Click here for the Grade Structure and Policy for Medical Science Courses.

Respiratory Block:

The Respiratory Block begins the second semester of the Medical Sciences (MSC) portion of the Foundation Phase of the Translational Education at Carolina (TEC) Curriculum. This block focuses on physiology, pathology, pathophysiology, radiology, and pharmacology as they relate to human respiratory tract diseases. In addition, the Respiratory Block provides concise overviews of relevant diseases of the head and neck, and respiratory tract histology and embryology. The block builds on prior microbiology and immunology material by examining the major respiratory tract microbial pathogens as well as antimicrobial therapy in relation to pneumonia.

Block Directors:

Urinary Block:

The goals of this block are to introduce the normal embryology, anatomy/structure, and physiology of the kidney and urinary tract.  The block will also introduce the common fluid, electrolyte, acid-base, nephrologic and urologic diseases to provide a foundation for the diagnosis and management of these disorders in clinical practice. This block will also provide students with the skills to understand and manage fluid and electrolyte disorders and common disorders of the kidney and urinary tract in the context of clinical rotations in the Application and Individualization phases.

Block Directors:

Gastrointestinal System Block:

The overarching goals of this block are to introduce students to normal embryology, structure, and function of the oropharynx, digestive tract, liver and pancreas. Have students understand the normal digestive tract flora and common digestive tract pathogens as well as the pathology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of common oropharyngeal, digestive tract, liver and pancreatic diseases. This course intends to provide students with the skills to understand and manage digestive tract, liver and pancreatic diseases in the context of your clinical rotations in the Application and Individualization phases.

Block Directors:

Musculoskeletal Block:

The overall goal of the Musculoskeletal Block is to increase the learner's knowledge of the development, structure, and function of the skin and musculoskeletal system and the physiology and biochemistry of bone, cartilage, synovium, and muscle. This block will also acquaint the learner with the pathological conditions altering normal structure, function, biochemistry, and physiology of the musculoskeletal system and skin. This course enables the learner to acquire the information and skills necessary to evaluate a patient with injury or disease of the musculoskeletal system and describe and discuss the pathogenesis of inflammatory, infectious, reactive, and neoplastic skin disorders. Synthesis of the knowledge in this block will enable the learner to apply his knowledge and skills to the diagnosis and management of patients with musculoskeletal pathology.

Block Directors:

Ed Kernick, PhD
Chris Sayed, MD
Susan Hadler, MD

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Patient Centered Care Course 2: MTEC 112 (5 credit hours)

PCC 2 Graphic

This course develops basic clinical skills and reasoning essential to the practice of medicine through clinical experiences, longitudinal contact with medical professionals, and integration with the concepts from the respiratory, urinary, gastrointestinal, and neurologic systems. This course is designed to enable the student to learn the core clinical skills—History-Taking, Physical Examination, Communication, Clinical Reasoning, Patient-Centered Care, and Professionalism— necessary for future patient care. The Patient Centered Care course is based primarily on weekly small group sessions where students learn clinical skills. In addition to these small group sessions, twice a semester students will participate in Clinical Skills Encounters (CSE's) with standardized patients in our Clinical Skills Center. During these CSE's students can practice the clinical skills they learned in prior sessions. In addition to these classroom and skills center experiences, students are expected to interact with real patients throughout the year in a variety of Patient Encounters.
Duration: Once a week, Spring Semester (January-May)

Course Directors:

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Social and Health Systems Course 2: MTEC 122 (1 credit hour)

Professional Development 2 Graphic

This course explores the socio-cultural, political, legal, and ethical dimensions of medical care through research, small-group discussion, and integration with concepts from the basic sciences
and body systems as well as provides a structure for students to reflect on, develop, and track professional goals through faculty mentorships. During the course, students engage with issues through readings, discussions, and a small number of lectures. The core of this course is the directed discussion that takes place in seminar groups. Course faculty members come from clinical, social science, and humanities backgrounds, and all bring to the seminar sessions significant experience in interdisciplinary research and teaching.
Duration: Once a week, Spring Semester (January-May)

Course Director:

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