Christine Kistler, MD, MASc

Associate Professor, Division of Geriatric Medicine
Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine

Specialty Areas: Geriatrics, serious illness care, hospice and palliative care

Geriatrics Specialty Clinic Provider: No
UNC Hospitals Provider: Yes Inpatient Palliative Care Consultation
 
Education Chronology:
2011 – 2011 Continuing: Faculty Development in Health Literacy & Aging. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC
2008 – 2010 Research Fellowship: Geriatrics. University of California, San Francisco, CA
2010 MASc: Clinical Research. University of California, San Francisco
2010 Certificate: National Quality Scholars Fellowship Program. Department of Veterans Affairs
2007- 2008 Clinical Fellowship: Geriatrics. University of California, San Francisco, CA, Clinical Fellowship in Geriatrics
2005 – 2007 Residency: Family Medicine. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ml
2004 – 2005 Internship: Family Medicine University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ml
2004 MD: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
1999 BA: Multidisciplinary Studies, International Relations, East Asia. Summa cum laude. North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
1998 Certificate: NUPACE, International Relations. Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
1997 BS: Animal Science. Summa cum laude. North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
 
Professional Chronology:
2010 – present Research/Assistant Professor, Division of Geriatric Medicine. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC
2010 – present Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC
2008 – 2010 Physician, Department of Medicine. San Francisco General Hospital, CA
2008 – 2010 Physician, San Francisco Veteran Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA

 

Research: Dr. Kistler’s research includes Older adults, complex medical decision making, cancer screening, and hospice/palliative care
 
Selected Bibliography:
  1. Kistler CE, Goldstein, A. The Risk of Adverse Cardiovascular Events from Varenicline against the Benefits in Mortality from Smoking Cessation. Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Mar 15. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22422928
  2. Kistler CE, Kirby KA, Lee D, Casadei MA, Walter LC. Long-term Outcomes Following Positive Fecal Occult Blood Test Results in Older Adults: Benefits and Burdens. Arch Intern Med. 2011 May 9. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 21555655.
  3. Carlson C, Kirby KA, Casadei MA, Partin MR, Kistler CE, Walter LC. Lack of Follow-up after Fecal Occult Blood Testing in Older Adults: Inappropriate Screening or Failure to Follow-up? Arch Intern Med. 2010 Oct 11. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 20937917
  4. Kistler CE, Walter LC, Mitchell CM, Sloane PD. Patient Perceptions of Mistakes in Ambulatory Care. Arch Intern Med. 2010 Sep 13; 170(16):1480-7.PMID: 20837835
  5. Mehta KM, Fung KZ, Kistler CE, Chang A, Walter LC. Impact of cognitive impairment on screening mammography use in older US women. Am J Pub Health 2010 (electronic publication 14Jan10). PMID: 20075325
  6. Lewis CL; Kistler CE; Amick HR; Watson LC; Bynum DL; Walters LC; Pignone MP. Older Adults’ Residents ofTwo Continuing Care Communities. BMC Geriatrics 2006, 6:10 (03Aug2006). PMID: 16887040
  7. Kistler CE; Lewis CL; Amick HR; Bynum DL; Walters LC; Watson LC. Older adults’ beliefs about physician-estimated life expectancy: a cross-sectional survey. BMC Family Practice 2006, 7:9 (11Feb2006). PMID: 16472399
  8. Watson LC; Lewis CL; Kistler CE; Amick HR; Boustani M. Can we trust depression screening instruments in healthy ‘old-old’ adults? lnt J Geriatr Psychiatry- 01-MAR-2004; 19(3): 278-85. PMID: 15027044
Christine Kistler, MD