Cancer Research Division

Our Cancer Research Division has as its focus the molecular underpinnings of cancer etiology and radiation response, and application of this knowledge to new cancer drug discovery.

 

The Division consists of five faculty members whose research efforts encompass both mechanistic studies of the basis of cancer development and maintenance, and translational research into molecular target validation and new drug discovery.  Similarly, our research on cellular responses to radiation bridges both types of research.  Our internationally-recognized investigators use state-of-the-art model systems and animal-, cell- and in vitro- based biological, biochemical and molecular biology techniques to study oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

Andrienne Cox

Dr. Adrienne Cox (lab) concentrates on signaling from Ras and Rho family small GTPases in pancreatic and colorectal cancer models.

Jim Raleigh (new)

Dr. James Raleigh, Professor Emeritus, remains active in the area of tumor physiology, in particular the detection and prognostic significance of hypoxic cells in human tumors.
Andrew Wang, simulator Dr. Andrew Wang (lab) researches nanotechnology-based methods of targeting radiation and drug delivery to tumors using cells in culture and mouse models of cancer.

Dr. Elaine Zeman

Dr. Elaine Zeman is a classically-trained, clinically-oriented radiation biologist who devotes herself to the biology teaching needs of our radiation oncology residents, radiation therapists, medical dosimetrists and medical physicists.
Yanping Zhang Dr. Yanping Zhang (lab) specializes in the p53/Mdm2/Arf tumor suppressor pathway in leukemias and solid tumor models.

 

We are a highly collaborative group and maintain research associations with colleagues within the Department, the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and with top investigators both nationally and internationally from academia and the pharmaceutical industry.

One exciting intra-Departmental collaboration involves the development and implementation of nanotechnology-based radiation research technology.  This effort is spearheaded by Dr. Sha Chang (Physics and Computing Division).  Such technology has the potential to revolutionize methods for assessing cellular responses to therapeutically-relevant doses of radiation by allowing us to observe these responses in real time in living cells. In addition, we are using nanotechnology to create small animal-sized imaging and radiation therapy equipment in order to simulate human radiotherapy in animal models.