Arterial Thrombosis

Interplay between abnormalities in blood components, the vasculature, and blood flow contribute to the development of arterial thrombosis. Arterial thrombosis involves the formation of platelet-rich “white clots” that form after rupture of atherosclerotic plaques and exposure of procoagulant material such as lipid-rich macrophages (foam cells), collagen, tissue factor, and/or endothelial breach, in a high shear environment. TM = thrombomodulin; II = prothrombin; IIa = thrombin; Fgn = fibrinogen; TF = tissue factor.


Wolberg AS, Aleman MM, Thrombosis Research 2010 Apr;125 Suppl 1:S35-7

Interplay between abnormalities in blood components, the vasculature, and blood flow contribute to the development of arterial thrombosis. Arterial thrombosis involves the formation of platelet-rich “white clots” that form after rupture of atherosclerotic plaques and exposure of procoagulant material such as lipid-rich macrophages (foam cells), collagen, tissue factor, and/or endothelial breach, in a high shear environment. TM = thrombomodulin; II = prothrombin; IIa = thrombin; Fgn = fibrinogen; TF = tissue factor.