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Using Collaboration to Fight a Tricky Tick-Borne Disease

November 22, 2022

Alpha-Gal Syndrome, or AGS, is a recently identified tick-borne disease that triggers an allergy to red meat and other products made from mammals, including cheese, gelatin, and medications like heparin. Since its discovery in 2009, cases in the United States alone have risen from 24 to >40,000 people, owing to the geographic spread of the … Continued

Dr. Erin Steinbach Publishes Article on Intestinal Epithelial Cell Barrier Dysfunction in Peanut Allergy

November 14, 2022

The findings were identified in an orally susceptible murine model of peanut allergy and in pediatric patients with peanut allergy. Dr. Steinbach characterized increased intestinal epithelial cell barrier permeability in mice with peanut allergy and identified elevated Angiopoietin-like 4 as a possible contributor to this phenomenon. Because severe allergic reactions to peanut are associated with … Continued

Dr. Mildred Kwan and Dr. Andrew Winslow Receive $100K Pfizer Grant to Address Health Disparities in Antimicrobial Stewardship

November 8, 2022

The 2-year grant will help build capacity to address health disparities through antimicrobial stewardship telehealth and telemonitoring. The name of the grant is: “A novel patient-led penicillin allergy de-labeling program targeting underserved children through a mobile-enabled virtual platform.” Dr. Kwan is an Allergy & Immunology faculty member in the UNC Thurston Arthritis Research Center, and … Continued

Dr. Longobardi’s Research Demonstrates Deletion of Ccr2 in Cartilaginous Tissues Reduces Impact of Post Traumatic Osteoarthritis & Pain

September 12, 2022

Lara Longobardi, PhD, is an associate professor in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology. The research showed early deletion of Ccr2 in aggrecan-expressing cells reduces the initiation, but not the progression, of post traumatic osteoarthritis and its associated pain. View the article published in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage.

Dr. Saira Sheikh Co-Authors Study for a Novel Therapeutic that Shows Promise in Cutaneous Lupus

August 3, 2022

Saira Sheikh, MD, associate professor in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, was the UNC Principal Investigator. The study, recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, explored treating adults with cutaneous lupus using litifilimab. The trial was conducted at UNC’s Clinical & Translational Research Center (CTRC), a resource through North Carolina Translational and … Continued

Allen Receives 2-Year NIAMS Grant

January 21, 2022

Kelli Allen, PhD, professor of medicine in the division of rheumatology, allergy, and immunology, received a grant for a project titled “Optimizing Osteoarthritis Care Through Clinical & Community Partnerships.” The project addresses a critical need to improve care for patients with OA through an evidence-based, comprehensive and sustainable care model. Learn more.

Increasing Participation of Underrepresented in Lupus Clinical Trials

January 9, 2022

Saira Sheikh, MD, the Linda Coley Sewell Distinguished Professor of Medicine in the division of rheumatology, and research associate Tessa Englund, PhD, MPH, described the barriers in lupus clinical trial enrollment and how they can be addressed to ensure equitable representation. Read the article published in Rheumatology Advisor.  

Newsworthy from the Department of Medicine, Week of October 29 – November 4

November 16, 2021

The below clickable headlines link directly to outside media outlets and feature UNC Department of Medicine faculty, starting Friday, November 4, 2021. What every parent should know about Halloween safety | Four 2 Five – Dr. Emily Sickbert-Bennett (MSN.com) Food Allergy Families Seek Out Hard-to-Find Immunotherapy – Dr. Edwin Kim (WebMD) Pandemic-related drinking causing spike in … Continued

Penicillin Allergy Assessments Expand to Inpatient Areas

October 1, 2021

Imagine: You have a patient with a penicillin allergy documented in their chart. Typically, you would prescribe amoxicillin for their infection, but that is not an option because it is a penicillin-class antibiotic. Instead, you prescribe a broader-spectrum antibiotic–not your first choice except for the allergy. But, what if you learned that it is not … Continued