Ann Dennis, MD

Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, School of Medicine

Ann Dennis, MD

Phone: (919) 966-2536
Fax: (919) 966-6714
Email: adennis@med.unc.edu

Division of Infectious Diseases
CB# 7030, Bioinformatics Building
130 Mason Farm Road, 2nd Floor
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7030

Education

M.D., University of New Mexico School of Medicine, 2004

Board Certifications

American Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine, 2008
American Board of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases, 2010

Research Summary

My research broadly encompasses the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of HIV/AIDS, particularly among minority and immigrant populations.  Ongoing research projects include the evaluation of HIV transmission networks in North Carolina using phylogenetic reconstruction of HIV pol sequences, comparison of social recruitment and HIV transmission networks in Central America, and HIV among immigrant Latinos in North Carolina.  I am also very interested in the application of phylogenetic methods in HIV prevention research and primary HIV infection, late presentation to HIV care, and early testing strategies/ linkage to care among minorities.

Publications

Search PubMed
Dennis Biosketch

Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, School of Medicine

Ann Dennis, MD

Phone: (919) 966-2536
Fax: (919) 966-6714
Email: adennis@med.unc.edu

Division of Infectious Diseases
CB# 7030, Bioinformatics Building
130 Mason Farm Road, 2nd Floor
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7030

Education

M.D., University of New Mexico School of Medicine, 2004

Board Certifications

American Board of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine, 2008
American Board of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases, 2010

Research Summary

My research broadly encompasses the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of HIV/AIDS, particularly among minority and immigrant populations.  Ongoing research projects include the evaluation of HIV transmission networks in North Carolina using phylogenetic reconstruction of HIV pol sequences, comparison of social recruitment and HIV transmission networks in Central America, and HIV among immigrant Latinos in North Carolina.  I am also very interested in the application of phylogenetic methods in HIV prevention research and primary HIV infection, late presentation to HIV care, and early testing strategies/ linkage to care among minorities.

Publications

Search PubMed
Dennis Biosketch