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UNC’s chapter of LMSA’s primary goal is to gather students of all backgrounds at the under-graduate and graduate levels alongside physicians, to work together on improving the health of the Latino community. We would love to hear from you and talk with you about how you can get involved. Check out our webpage on Student Life.

UNC LMSA proudly supports access to medical school and all forms of higher education, regardless of documentation status.

Vision

To improve the well-being of the Latino community locally, throughout the state of North Carolina, and globally through continuous efforts abroad.

Mission

  • Construct a community between undergraduate students, medical students and physicians interested in Latino health.
  • Further the recruitment and retention of underrepresented students in medicine
  • Educate the general body of medical students on Latino health issues
  • Advocate for the rights of Latinos in health care
  • Grant leadership and volunteering opportunities

Chapter History

Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) was created to represent, support, educate, and unify US Latino(a) medical students, as well as students who are interested in Latino healthcare. The network of latino/a medical students is made of 5 regions: Midwest, Northeast, Southwest, West, and Southeast region. The UNC LMSA chapter was founded in 2013 with the goal of gathering students of all backgrounds at the undergraduate and graduate levels alongside physicians, to work together on improving the health of the Latino community in North Carolina and beyond. This includes supporting students in direct efforts such as community service initiatives and indirect efforts such as drafting policy resolutions to present at national meetings. LMSA encourages student-led efforts that positively impact our community and that develops and refines our personal aptitudes and skills.

Leadership

PositionOfficer(s)Contact Information
Co-PresidentsSophia McFarlane

Dillon Strepay
sophia_mcfarlane@med.unc.edu

dillon_strepay@med.unc.edu
Vice PresidentCandace Barrcandace_barr@med.unc.edu
SecretaryChristina Williamschristina_c_williams@med.unc.edu
TreasurerRichard Beckett-Ansakayisi@med.unc.edu
ParliamentarianChristina Williamschristina_c_williams@med.unc.edu
Community Service Co-ChairsPrincess Onuorah

Courtney Roberts
princess_onuorah@med.unc.edu

courtney_roberts@med.unc.edu
HPREP CoordinatorsImani Sweatt

Joseph Locklear
imanis@live.unc.edu

joseph_locklear@med.unc.edu
MSTEP CoordinatorsAaron Morris

Ariel Harris
aaron_morris@med.unc.edu

ariel_harris@med.unc.edu
YSEP CoordinatorsAyo Matory

Ruthly Francois
ayo_matory@med.unc.edu

ruthly@ad.unc.edu
MAPS LiaisonsJoseph Locklear

Richard Beckett-Ansa
joseph_locklear@med.unc.edu

kayisi@med.unc.edu
Fundraising ChairJessica Evans

Taylor Henderson
jessica_evans@med.unc.edu

taylor_henderson@med.unc.edu
Social Co-ChairsBrittany Cureton

Dylane Davis
brittany_cureton@med.unc.edu

davisdn@med.unc.edu
Webmaster/HistorianJessica Evansjessica_evans@med.unc.edu
Recruitment LiaisonsTierra Bynum

Princess Onuorah
tierra_bynum@med.unc.edu

princess_onuorah@med.unc.edu
Minority Men in Medicine (MMM) CoordinatorsNathan Shenkute

Theodore Moore II
nathan_shenkute@med.unc.edu

theodore_moore@med.unc.edu
Minority Women in Medicine (MWM) CoordinatorsVictoria Person

Dylane Davis
victoria_person@med.unc.edu

davisdn@med.unc.edu
Minority Round Table Co-ChairsImani Sweatt

Ariel Harris
imanis@live.unc.edu

ariel_harris@med.unc.edu
U360 Co-LeadersRuthly Francois

Christina Williams
ruthly@ad.unc.edu

christina_c_williams@med.unc.edu

Events and Socials

National Hispanic Heritage Month
“Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402. The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Día de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period.” – The Library of Congress, http://hispanicheritagemonth.gov/about
Undergraduate Cadaver Tour
Every year, LMSA hosts a cadaver tour for LMSA+ members, our undergraduate group. The purpose is to increase interest in medicine among undergrads, to provide more exposure to what medical school is really like, and to give them a chance to connect with medical students, who present their own cadavers and are also available to answer questions.
National Conference
In Late Spring, LMSA hosts an annual National Conference. It’s a fantastic opportunity to connect with medical students from schools across the country and learn about what LMSA is doing on a national level. We always want to send LMSA members every year, but space and money is limited, so we prioritize sending our most active and hardworking members first.
National Hispanic Medical Association
Every Spring, NHMA hosts a national conference, which we always try to attend. NHMA is the adult version of LMSA, in essence. Its members are all physicians, though LMSA members can attend the conference due to the close connection the two organizations share. Attending the NHMA is a great networking opportunity, getting to meet and talk with a wide variety of physicians and medical students.
Southeastern Regional Conference
The Southeastern Regional Conference is our home conference. We attend every year and even hosted the conference during our first year. As with the other conferences, this is a great networking opportunity, though at this conference, we get the chance to closely connect with the other regional LMSA chapters. Below is a photo from the 2015 Regional Conference, which was held in Puerto Rico.
Hispanic Educational Summit
In the Fall, a local high school hosts a Hispanic Educational Summit. We attend every year with the aim to inspire high school students into going to college and possibly medical school. We want them to know and see that they too can do what we have done, that they can succeed like we have.
Charlas with El Centro Hispano
Info Coming soon…
Doctors for Diversity
LMSA along with SNMA, AMWA, MESA and QSA joined together in an event to embrace the need for diversity recognition and exploring how the phrase “cultural competency” is different for everyone.
LMSA + DACA
Info Coming soon…
High School Social

Remember that phase you had in high school? LMSA joined the Latino Business and Law Student Associations at UNC to bring it back! Amid black eye-liner, backwards baseball caps and peace signs, LMSA was able to connect with the various latino students on campus, listen to our favorite high school songs, and reminisce about the good ol’ days.

Cinco De Mayo with SNMA
Info Coming soon…

UNC LMSA Statement on Undocumented Immigration and DACA

September 8, 2017

Community,

In light of the Trump Administration’s recent announcement regarding the impending termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, the UNC School of Medicine Chapter of the Latinx Medical Student Association (LMSA) would like to re-emphasize its strong support of undocumented immigrants and DACA recipients, express solidarity with our immigrant family members, and offer resources to empower your communities with information.

As members of the healthcare community, we recognize the importance of stable legal status on health, well-being, and access to opportunities. Undocumented immigrants and DACA recipients are an essential part of our community and are integral to the multicultural identity of the United States. By ending the DACA program, this administration has placed the future and wellbeing of 800,000 young immigrants in jeopardy. We do not support the notion that immigrants should be protected solely because of their utility to the American and global economies, but rather because of the shared humanity that connects us as family, friends, neighbors, and peers.

Listed below are resources for DACA recipients and supporters, compiled by UNC LMSA and the LMSA-West Policy Team, and information on what you can do to stand in solidarity with those who benefit from DACA. We strongly encourage taking a few moments to take action on this important issue.

Solidaridad,

UNC School of Medicine Latinx Medical Student Association