Thomas Kash, Ph.D.

Assistant ProfessorThomas Kash, Ph.D.
Department of Pharmacology
Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies

 Office | 5023 Thurston-Bowles Bldg, CB#7178
Email | tkash@email.unc.edu
Lab Website | Molecular Neurophysiology
Biographical Biosketch | pdf

Research Interests

My broad scientific goal is to understand how modulation of discrete neuronal circuits can shape behavior and to deconstruct the molecular mechanisms that underlie this modulation. Research in my lab is focused on understanding how stress and drug abuse can alter neuronal function in brain regions that regulate emotional behavior. This is a topic that is fascinating from a basic science standpoint, but also absolutely critical from the public health standpoint, as psychiatric disorders exert a tremendous economic impact on our society.  These investigations are performed using a multidisciplinary approach, ranging from behavioral analysis to detailed mechanistic signaling analysis in individual neurons. This integrative approach has been exciting and has allowed me to move my science beyond correlation to explore causative relationships. I have multiple active projects and grants related to discovering different aspects of stress and drug induced behavioral pathologies, ranging from examining the impact of stress on the amygdala to understanding how binge-drinking can modulate neuropeptide signaling in the bed nucleus of the stria termanlis.  My goal moving forward is to continue to probe causative mechanisms of modulation in the brain. In addition, via a collaboration with Bryan Roth, I am working to develop new chemical genetic tools that will allow for a more refined dissection of how signaling in the brain can alter behavior.

News

Recent Publications

Click here for a full list of publications from PubMed

Sex differences in the behavioral sequelae of chronic ethanol exposure.  Jury NJ, DiBerto JF, Kash TL, Holmes A. Alcohol. 2017 Feb;58:53-60. doi: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2016.07.007. PMID:27624846

Effects of chronic alcohol consumption on neuronal function in the non-human primate BNST.  Pleil KE, Helms CM, Sobus JR, Daunais JB, Grant KA, Kash TL. Addict Biol. 2016 Nov;21(6):1151-1167. doi: 10.1111/adb.12289. PMID:26223349

Potent and Selective Peptide-based Inhibition of the G Protein Gαq.  Charpentier TH, Waldo GL, Lowery-Gionta EG, Krajewski K, Strahl BD, Kash TL, Harden TK, Sondek J. J Biol Chem. 2016 Dec 2;291(49):25608-25616. PMID:27742837

Serotonin engages an anxiety and fear-promoting circuit in the extended amygdala.  Marcinkiewcz CA, Mazzone CM, D'Agostino G, Halladay LR, Hardaway JA, DiBerto JF, Navarro M, Burnham N, Cristiano C, Dorrier CE, Tipton GJ, Ramakrishnan C, Kozicz T, Deisseroth K, Thiele TE, McElligott ZA, Holmes A, Heisler LK, Kash TLNature. 2016 Sep 1;537(7618):97-101. doi: 10.1038/nature19318. PMID:27556938

Serotonin's Complex Role in Alcoholism: Implications for Treatment and Future Research  Marcinkiewcz CA, Lowery-Gionta EG, Kash TLAlcohol Clin Exp Res. 2016 Jun;40(6):1192-201. doi: 10.1111/acer.13076. Review. PMID:27161942