Aziz Sancar, Md, Phd – 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Just when you figure we know everything, all of a sudden, something comes along, and there is a whole new field to explore."
-Aziz Sancar


Welcome


Welcome to UNC Biochemistry and Biophysics. We have a vigorous, diverse research program and we are home to UNC Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Aziz Sancar. We are the 4th highest NIH funded biochemistry department in the country for 2018. We provide a robust educational and research training program for our graduate students that prepares them for top careers in biochemical and biophysical sciences or related fields. We invite you to explore our website to learn more about our research, graduate program, events and dynamic people who make us great!

Leslie Parise
Leslie Parise, PhD Professor and Chair


Featured News


photo of inside of a cryo-TEM

The CryoEM Revolution has Arrived

Installation of a Thermo Scientific Talos Arctica 200 Kv cryo-transmission electron microscope (cryo-TEM) is nearly complete in the Glaxo Research Building at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Once functioning this summer, this $3-million instrument will bring exciting new capabilities to researchers across the university and others in the RTP area. The Talos Artica will be the centerpiece of the new cryoEM core facility, directed by Joshua Strauss, PhD, assistant professor in the department of biochemistry and biophysics.

photo of hospital buildings at UNC

New School of Medicine Intranet is a hub for internal resources

Accessing news and information about the School of Medicine just got easier. The SOM Intranet will become the hub for internal resources that support our faculty and staff.

photo of William Marzluff, PhD distinguished faculty of biochemistry and biophysics and joint with biology

NIH awards nearly $2 million to Cell Microsystems to boost biomedical research

The lab of William Marzluff, PhD, UNC Kenan Distinguished Professor of Biochemistry & Biophysics will collaborate with Cell Microsystems on gene editing projects to speed up the use of CRISPR workflows in lab experiments.

photos of Pengda Liu PhD and Shelton Earp MD

Study provides insights behind hyperactivation of key cell proliferation signal

In a study in Nature Communications, Pengda Liu, PhD, assistant professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics and Shelton Earp, MD, director of UNC Lineberger and the Lineberger Professor of Cancer Research, and their collaborators reported discoveries about a key signaling pathway that can be hyperactive in kidney cancer.

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